Eastern Michigan University
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New Faculty Add Fresh Ideas and New Approaches

Published February 20, 2013

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Fresh ideas. New approaches. The latest research. These are among assets new COB faculty bring to Eastern Michigan University. They join seasoned veterans in providing EMU students with a well-balanced educational experience.

"I like to think I bring new ideas to the table," says Priyanka Meharia, an assistant professor of accounting information systems. "I try to incorporate the latest training materials based on fresh research," adds Meharia, who began teaching accounting information systems classes at EMU in 2011.

Chong Oh, an assistant professor of computer information systems who began teaching at Eastern last year, says his classes reflect the latest technology in delivery and content. Not only are quizzes, grading and scheduling online, but he often uses contemporary movie clips as well as recent Youtube and Facebook examples to illustrate concepts taught in class. "My examples are current," Oh says. "Students relate to them well."

Micah Murphy, an assistant professor of marketing who began teaching marketing classes at EMU last year, says his experiences as a graduate student are still fresh, enabling him to relate to the challenges his own students face as they grapple with rapidly changing technology. This is especially true when it comes to conducting surveys, he adds.

"Years ago, surveys were conducted on paper and the format remained relatively stable. Today, most surveys are online and their formats are constantly changing," Murphy says. "Also, surveys of the past were comparatively longer. Today's surveys are short and key words have to be chosen carefully because the average respondent has little time to spare."

To top it off, survey tools are constantly being updated. "I'm used to it and can help students navigate through the changing technology," he adds.

Another advantage newcomers offer is a narrowing of the generation gap.   Both Meharia and Murphy say they have occasionally been mistaken for college students.  "This helps some students feel comfortable talking with me after class and can help speed the process of relationship building," Murphy says.