Eastern Michigan University
College of Education at Eastern Michigan University
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Hall of Fame
 
 

2003 Inductees

Frank J. Manley

Frank J. Manley

Frank J. Manley, 1928. Frank Manley is considered by many as the founder of the "community school" movement. He began his career in the Flint schools as an athletic coach and teacher. With the aid of philanthropist Charles S. Mott, Manley initiated an after-school and Saturday activity program in several Flint-area elementary schools in 1935. This modest beginning grew into a national and international movement, supported for years by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. Manley rose to become the Executive Director of the Mott Foundation. His work led to the creation of the Mott Fellows, the National Network of University-Based Community Education Centers, the National Center for Community Education, and the National Community Education Association, among other organizational entities. Manley's vision has reached to touch the lives of millions of youth.

William P. Morris

William P. Morris

William P. Morris, 1964, 1968. During his 31 years in public education, William Morris served as an elementary teacher, coach, high school principal and, for 22 years, as a superintendent in Summerfield and of the Monroe County Intermediate School District. He was active in professional organizations, holding numerous leadership roles at all levels, including serving as the president of the Michigan Association of School Administrators. In 1991-92 he was president of the American Association of School Administrators. He holds the EMU Distinguished Alumnus award and the AASA Distinguished Service Award and he is a member of the Michigan Education Hall of Fame. Currently in the private sector as a founder and president of the Monroe County Industrial Development Corporation, William Morris continues to support education in a wide variety of ways.

Robert C. Parks

Robert C. Parks

Robert C. Parks, 1952. Robert C. "Bob" Parks was a track star in high school and at Michigan State Normal College. He taught and coached at several Michigan high schools and at Western Michigan University, with his track and cross country teams receiving many awards. He came to EMU in 1967 and coached here for 34 years, during which time he also taught in the College of Education. Parks was named "Coach of the Year" for the Mid-American conference 26 times and NCAA Division I "Coach of the Year" in 1990, among dozens of other coaching recognitions. His teams won 45 MAC conference titles and seven NCAA Division I individual titles, plus two relays. Ten of his athletes made 15 appearances in Olympic Games, winning gold, silver and bronze medals. Parks in a member of the EMU Athletic Hall of Fame and the United States Track Coaches Association Hall of Fame.

David E. Smith

David E. Smith

David E. Smith, 1898. Born in Cortland, New York in 1860, David E. Smith was admitted to the bar in 1884. He studied mathematics at Syracuse University and served on the faculty of Michigan State Normal School from 1891-1901, before joining Teachers College, Columbia University. He served as a professor of mathematics there until his death in 1944. He also served as the Teachers College librarian, 1902-1920. The author of more than 500 publications (including 50 books) in the history of mathematics and in mathematics education, several of Smith's books are still in use. He served as editor of several journals and as president of the History of Science Society. He was inducted into the Kappa Delta Pi Laureate chapter in 1936. His personal collection of rare books and apparatus related to mathematics is in the Columbia Library.

James A. Wilsford

James A. Wilsford

James A. Wilsford, 1970. James Wilsford was a teacher of English, principal, and associate superintendent in Savannah, GA. He became one of the early advocates of the extensive use of computers in schools. As superintendent of the Orangeburg, South Carolina district-a district with a very high proportion of at-risk children-he used computers, software, and multimedia to accomplish many goals simultaneously. These included dramatic increases in test scores, a great reduction in dropouts, increased college attendance rates, and substantial parent and community involvement, among many others. The American Association of School Administrators honored him as national "Superintendent of the Year" in 1989. He received the ComputerWorld Smithsonian Award and he was honored by the South Carolina state legislature, among many other recognitions. Since retiring from the superintendency, he continued his work in the private sector as a developer and publisher of multimedia, interactive educational software.

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