April 19, 2014

EMU receives $634,000 grant from state to help stem nursing shortage

by Ward Mullens, Published March 16, 2009

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YPSILANTI —Eastern Michigan University School of Nursing has received a $634,000 grant from the Michigan departments of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth (DELEG) and Community Health (MDCH).

Awarded as part of the Michigan Nurse Corps (MNC) program, this grant will produce new classroom faculty and clinical instructors in a 12-to-15 month period instead of four to six years of part-time study.

The MNC provides educational stipends and tuition to graduate nursing students. In return for the financial help, these new faculty will be required to teach in a Michigan nursing education program for five years.

“The EMU award will help to accelerate the plans of study for a master’s degree in nursing students who will be very close to graduation, or will graduate, at the end of the 12-month grant program.  These graduates will be ready to accept positions as nursing faculty in colleges and universities, which, in turn, will expand the nursing workforce in Michigan,” said Betty Beard, interim director of the EMU School of Nursing.

The goal of the MNC is to rapidly produce nursing educators so schools can admit more nursing students. The result will be the expansion of nursing seats and clinical education slots in Michigan.

In 2007, Michigan nursing programs were unable to admit more than 4,000 qualified applicants because of a lack of faculty and clinical placements, according to Beard.

Michigan’s nursing shortage is estimated to be 18,000 by the year 2015. This critical shortage is both a public health concern and an economic development opportunity for Michigan.

Governor Jennifer M. Granholm established the MNC in 2007 to address the nursing shortage in Michigan.

EMU has been preparing high quality nursing faculty members through the Master’s of Science in Nursing Program for more than 13 years.

As an integral unit of Eastern Michigan University since 1973, the School of Nursing prepares professional nurses to meet society’s needs and the needs of the state and region. Both the BSN and MSN programs are fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and approved by the State of Michigan Board of Nursing. For more information, go to http://www.emich.edu/nursing/

Ward Mullens

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