April 21, 2014

Holocaust Memorial Center, Eastern Michigan to help educators expand knowledge, resources for teaching about the Holocaust.

by Pamela Young, Published July 21, 2011

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YPSILANTI - The Holocaust - the systematic murder of six million Jewish men, women and children by the Nazis - occurred more than 60 years ago. Its legacy, however, still impacts today's society.  The challenge is to reach out to the succeeding generations through teaching.

The Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus and Eastern Michigan University hope to make a difference in schools by offering the annual seminar, "Reading the Holocaust: A Seminar for Teachers," Aug. 15-19, at the Center, 28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills. The cost is $100.

The weeklong seminar will offer the latest academic scholarship and instructional practices to help teachers make the Holocaust understandable and meaningful for students. Participants also will have access to primary resources from the museum's library and archives to help develop their classroom lessons.

Guest speakers, including scholars and survivors, will examine the rise of Nazism to the Holocaust deniers of today.

Speakers include:

  • Sidney Bolkosky, William E. Stirton professor, social sciences, University of Michigan Dearborn and director of the honors program
  • Robert Franciosi, professor, English and honors, Grand Valley State University
  • Henry Greenspan, psychologist and playwright, University of Michigan
  • Jack Kay, professor, communications, Eastern Michigan University
  • Martin Shichtman, professor, English language and literature, director of Jewish Studies, Eastern Michigan University
  • John Staunton, associate professor, English language and literature, Eastern Michigan University
  • Guy Stern, distinguished professor emeritus of German, Wayne State University
  • Annette Wannamaker, associate professor, English language and literature, Eastern Michigan University

"This is so exciting because of the different perspectives being offered," said Martin Shichtman, professor of English language and literature and director of Jewish Studies at Eastern Michigan University. "We're bringing together specialists from other universities who care deeply about teaching the Holocaust. For instance, Jack Kay, professor of communications at Eastern Michigan, is a nationally recognized expert on fanatical militia groups."

"I'd like the participants to come out of the seminar with many different ways to talk about the Holocaust and how to present the different issues to students in the classroom," he said. "The Holocaust still has meaning and still affects our culture, and the way we think and behave."

To register, visit http://ep.emich.edu and click on the link for "Reading the Holocaust: A Seminar for Teachers."   Nine SB-CEUs or three undergraduate or graduate credit hours are available for an additional fee. To learn more, call Julie Knutson at 734-487-3152 or write to Rebecca Swindler at education@holocaustcenter.org.

 

 

Pamela Young

pyoung@emich.edu

734.487.4400

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