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Jan. 26 , 2005
CONTACT: Carol Anderson
734.487.4400
carol.anderson@emich.edu

EMU open house gives high school girls chance to see opportunities in manufacturing

YPSILANTIIn the past, opening doors for women literally meant helping them in or out of a car or a building. Eastern Michigan University is helping open doors for women … in the manufacturing industry.

During EMU’s first Manufacturing Technology Open House Jan. 30, 2-4 p.m., in Sill Hall, high school girls and their parents can investigate manufacturing opportunities. The event is free.

 “Females are an under-represented group in manufacturing and there are many opportunities for them,” said Philip Rufe, instructor, EMU School of Engineering Technology. “The EMU Open House is an opportunity for high school girls and their parents to become acquainted with manufacturing and the diverse career opportunities open to them. The information that students come away with about our manufacturing engineering technology program will help them make informed decisions about a career and EMU.”

The open house will feature presentations, panel discussions and a question-and-answer period followed by a lab tour that will demonstrate several types of equipment including computer-aided modeling and rapid prototyping.

Presentations and discussions will include Kathy Kustron of the Lear Corporation; Anne Stefango of the Society of Women Engineers; and Karen Shifferd and Natalie Lowell of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

Speakers will relate personal success stories, share their experiences in manufacturing and elaborate on the opportunities for women in manufacturing, said Rufe.

Two students in the manufacturing engineering program will talk about their educational experiences at EMU and their professional goals.

“Manufacturing is a growing field, but many women are fearful of it. They don’t realize that they can do it. There are so many things to do in the manufacturing field,” said Mary Finkel, a December 2004 manufacturing technology graduate from Westland.

Manufacturing engineers work with everyone from designers to production people, said Finkel. They are like team leaders who look at an entire operation of a product and make decisions, such as the best materials to use. Manufacturing engineers work a wide variety of industries, including automotive, aircraft and even cosmetics.

Finkel said EMU’s manufacturing technology program gave her real hands-on experience as opposed to only theoretical information. She recommends that girls take science and math courses in high school to prepare for the wide variety of courses offered at Eastern Michigan.

“I decided to go into manufacturing because I always wanted to create things. I had a very creative mind and was very energetic. If I had a problem, I always found a solution,” said Brandy Lewis, a senior from Detroit, who plans to graduate in April 2005 with a degree in manufacturing technology.

For additional information, contact Rufe at 734.487.2040.

Eastern Michigan University is a public, comprehensive university that offers programs in the arts, sciences and professions. EMU prepares students with the intellectual skills and practical experiences to succeed in their careers and lives, and to be better citizens.

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Eastern Michigan University is a public, comprehensive university that offers programs in the arts, sciences and professions. EMU prepares students with the intellectual skills and practical experiences to succeed in their career and lives, and to be better citizens.

Editor's Note: Looking for an expert source for a story? Check out EMU's Eastern Experts online at www.emich.edu/univcomm/easternexperts.


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