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March 3 , 2005
CONTACT: Carol Anderson
734.487.4400
carol.anderson@emich.edu

EMU series looks at National Institutes of Health's "roadmap" to overcoming research barriers to a healthier America

YPSILANTI - Pooling resources to overcome research obstacles and ultimately improve the health of the American public is the next clinical research topic of Eastern Michigan University's Distinguished Speaker Series.

Duane Alexander, director of the National Institute of Child Health and Development at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) continues the series with his March 10 presentation, " The NIH Roadmap and Clinical Research."  

The free event, sponsored by EMU's Clinical Research Administration program, begins at   

7:30 p.m. at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Education Center, 4936 W. Clark St., Superior Township.

Alexander will discuss the cooperative effort or "roadmap" among all NIH facilities to work together and expedite the progress of their research.

"Certain obstacles require more resources to address them than any single institute can provide. Overcoming these obstacles will enable much more rapid translation of research advances to improve the health of the American people," said Alexander. "During the next five years, through these new initiatives, the NIH hopes that barriers to research progress will be overcome."

Alexander said obstacles include: insufficient practitioner training to involve patients in clinical trials; need for interdisciplinary training in clinical investigation; difficulty in developing sufficient quantities of new product quickly for studies; and different requirements for clinical research by various federal agencies.

The final program in the series will be the April 7 presentation, "Benefit vs. Risk: Who Gets to Decide?" by David Canter, site head, Pfizer Global Research and Development.

Canter will discuss how individuals can make personal decisions about the risks and benefits of medicines.

"EMU's Clinical Research Administration program was the first academic program of its kind in the nation. We constantly endeavor to maintain relevance in a rapidly changing field by hosting this series and bringing to campus nationally prominent speakers from government, industry and the clinical environment, said Stephen Sonstein, EMU coordinator, clinical research administration. "This year's speakers will discuss the safety of our medicines and the efforts by the federal government to translate the discoveries of science into innovative treatments for patients."

The series should be of interest to clinical researchers, individuals in the pharmaceutical and drug development industry, as well as students, faculty and the public, said Sonstein.

For more information, e-mail Sonstein at stephen.sonstein@emich.edu or call 734.487.1238.

Eastern Michigan University is a public, comprehensive university that offers programs in the arts, sciences and professions. EMU prepares students with the intellectual skills and practical experiences to succeed in their careers and lives, and to be better citizens.

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Eastern Michigan University is a public, comprehensive university that offers programs in the arts, sciences and professions. EMU prepares students with the intellectual skills and practical experiences to succeed in their career and lives, and to be better citizens.

Editor's Note: Looking for an expert source for a story? Check out EMU's Eastern Experts online at www.emich.edu/univcomm/easternexperts.


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