FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

April 24, 2001

CONTACT: Pam Young

734.487.4400


SCHOLLAERT NAMED PROVOST AT EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

YPSILANTI - Dr. Paul T. Schollaert has been named provost and vice president for academic affairs and professor of sociology at Eastern Michigan University. The appointment is effective July 1.

Schollaert (pronounced Skol lert), 54, has been dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of sociology at Illinois State University since 1993.

"Dr. Schollaert is a perfect match for Eastern Michigan University. He comes to us with a history of successful academic affairs leadership at a developed doctoral university with normal school roots and at a metropolitan university committed to public engagement," said Dr. Samuel A. Kirkpatrick, president of EMU. "He is a highly respected and thoughtful administrator who has played leadership roles in areas vital to EMU's future, including faculty development, doctoral programming, general education, diversity, international programs and strategic planning."

"I am extremely excited about coming to Eastern Michigan University. The university has in place very strong programs and an excellent faculty," said Schollaert. "President Kirkpatrick has energized the campus and thereÍs a genuine sense on campus that good things are happening. That's the kind of activity and sense of vision I want to be a part of. The potential for Eastern Michigan is enormous."

Schollaert earned a Ph.D. and a masterÍs degree in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a bachelorÍs degree in social welfare from the Pennsylvania State University.

During his tenure at Illinois State, he helped engineer a major revision of the faculty evaluation and reward system, and was involved in the reform of undergraduate general education. He also served on the universityÍs strategic planning committee and supported the establishment of new undergraduate and graduate programs.

Prior to his position at Illinois State, Schollaert was associate dean of the College of Arts and Letters at Old Dominion University in Virginia from 1987-1993 and was chair of the universityÍs department of sociology and criminal justice from 1983-1987. He joined the university in 1976 as an assistant professor. From 1972-1976, he was assistant professor of sociology at the University of South Carolina, Columbia.

His research and scholarly interests are in the field of demography and population. Much of his work has focused on the impact of race on social problems and on the determinants of birth timing among American women. He is the author of various refereed articles, technical reports and professional papers, and the recipient of research grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Institutes of Mental Health, the United Jewish Federation and the Southeastern Virginia Planning Commission, among others.

He was honored with Illinois StateÍs Distinguished Administrative Service Award in 1999 and has been active as a consultant and volunteer with various community service groups including the McLean County COMPACT, the YMCA, the NAACP and various public schools.

A native of Pittsburgh, he is married and has two children and one grandchild.

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