Eastern Michigan University
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Summer Field Classes - 2019

Scholarship funds are available for these courses. Please see our scholarship page for more information. The first round of applications are due on February 22, 2019. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis thereafter. It is better to apply early to ensure that funds are available. For questions about summer field classes, scholarships, and/or assistance with registration, please contact Dr. Marianne Laporte, Biology Department Head at mlaporte@emich.edu.

 


 BIO 418/518 Plant Communities of Michigan

Fish Lake Bog

  • Analysis of the natural plant communities of Michigan, with an emphasis on physical conditions supporting communities, species composition and geographic distribution.

  • 4 credit hours
  • CRNs: 52188/52189
  • Meets two Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at Fish Lake and one Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday Up North
    • May 30, 31, June 1 at Fish Lake
    • June 13, 14, 15, 16 Up North
    • June 27, 28, 29 at Fish Lake
  • Instructor: Dr. Gary Hannan
  • BIO 418 Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIO 310 Ecology

 BIO 477/590 Special Topics: Ornithological Methods

  • Animal Movement

    Ornithological Methods is an active learning experience investigating common methods for studying wild birds. This    course    complements Ornithology (BIO 485) and focuses on methods involving the capture, handling and sampling of songbirds. Students will learn a variety of techniques, contribute to a research goal and will discuss current methods and ethical issues surrounding research with wild birds. 
  • This special topics class counts as a restricted elective toward the biology major and the environmental biology concentration of the environmental science and society major
  • 1 credit hour
  • CRNs: 52590/52591
  • Meets May 16-18 at    Fish Lake    
  • Instructor:  Dr. Jamie Cornelius
  • BIO 477 Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIO120/121 Introductory Biology II

 BIO 478/591 Special Topics: Discover Tropical Invertebrates

Dive In

  • Explore the small island of San Salvador in the Bahamas.  Our base will be the Gerace Research Station from where we will have opportunities to explore various habitats. We will spend time snorkeling in a mangrove, around numerous small reefs and shorelines. Students will learn about reef, shoreline and aquatic communities. The focus is on observation and identification organisms in their natural environments. Assignments include readings/discussions of peer-reviewed literature related to local flora and fauna, a shell collection and photo ID of invertebrates.

  • 2 credit hours
  • This special topics class counts as a restricted elective toward the biology major and the environmental biology concentration of the environmental science and society major
  • CRNs: 26450/26451 (on the winter semester schedule)
  • Meets April 24 through May 4 in the Bahamas
  • Instructor: Dr. Cara Shillington
  • For more information, visit the  Academic Programs Abroad website

 BIO 479/592 Special Topics: Ecology & Biodiversity of Namibia

Namibia

  • This 16-day intensive field course is an introduction to the flora and fauna of Namibia as well as an opportunity to learn and experience Nambia’s rich history and culture.  Few countries in Africa can match Namibia’s sheer natural beauty and one of a major focus of the field class is to learn about the ecology and natural history of plants and animals; we will also spend three days at a research station and talk with interns and researchers about their work. We will visit Sossusvlei where the sand dunes is reminiscent of a Mars landscape; travel to the coast and spend time in Swakopmund and learn about the city’s colonial past and also spend several days at a research station. 

    Namibia is a fantastic place for viewing wildlife; at Etosha National Park and Damaraland, big cats, black rhino, desert-adapted elephants and plains game are abundant. Namibia has a rich ecology and history for students to explore.  We will have an opportunity to learn about a different culture and to meet and interact with many locals including university students to share and reflect ideas.  The sand dune ecosystem of the Namib desert contains a species-rich and highly endemic biota and we have arranged multiple opportunities for students to meet with experts to observe, discuss and gain hands-on experience interacting with some of the local flora and fauna. 

  • 3 credit hours
  • CRNs: TBD
  • Meets May 13-May 26 in Namibia
  • Instructor: Dr. Cara Shillington
  • For more information, visit the Academic Programs Abroad website

BIO 481/581 Natural History of Vertebrates

Behavioral Ecology

  • A survey of vertebrates, emphasizing their adaptations and their natural history. Laboratory work will stress the taxonomic classification, identification and distribution of local and other forms. Fieldwork will emphasize accurate observation and permanent recording of original data on local species.
  • 4 credit hours
  • CRNs: TBD
  • Meets Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at Fish Lake
    • July 11-13
    • July 18-20
    • August 1-3
  • Instructor: Dr. Peter Bednekoff
  • BIO 416 Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIO 120 and BIO 121 Introductory Biology II and Lab or equivalent

 


 

BIO 484/584 Herpetology

Mudpuppy

  • Taxonomy, distribution, life histories, behavior and ecology of amphibians and reptiles with an emphasis on local species.
  • 4 credit hours
  • CRNs: 52058/52059
  • Meets Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at  Fish Lake  or  Stone Lab
    • May 9,10,11 at Fish Lake
    • May 23, 24, 25 at Stone Lab
    • June 6, 7, 8 at Fish Lake
  • Instructor:  Dr. Katherine Greenwald
  • BIO 484 Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIO 120/121 Introductory Biology II with lab  or  grade of C or better in BIO 140 Biology of Animals

BIO 486/586 Entomology

Entomology

  • A survey of the world of insects, their structure, function, behavior, and ecology. The identification and classification of local insects will be stressed. A student field project will be required.
  • 4 credit hours
  • CRNs: 52573/52574
  • Meets Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays at Fish Lake
    • June 9-11
    • June 23-25
    • June 30-July 2
  • Instructor: Michael Kielb
  • BIO 484 Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIO 120/121 Introductory Biology II with lab or grade of C or better in BIO 140 Biology of Animals

BIO 493/593 Special Topics: Methods in Ecology

Methods in Ecology

  • Field course covering principles and select methods in terrestrial ecology, including – but not limited to – microclimate measurements, vegetation sampling, small mammal sampling, and animal behavioral assays. Methods in Ecology will consist of three distinct sections: 1) Tools and techniques for summarizing physical environments in habitats, 2) estimates of plant and animal abundance, and 3) estimates of animal behavior in the field.  All coursework will be centered around addressing the question:  “How do biological invasions influence our native environments?"
  • This special topics class counts as a restricted elective toward the biology major and the environmental biology concentration of the environmental science and society major
  • 4 credit hours
  • CRNs: 52592/52593
  • Meets Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at  Fish Lake
    • August 8, 9, 10
    • August 15, 16, 17
    • August 22, 23, 24
  • Instructor: Dr. Brian Connolly
  • BIO 493 Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIO120/121 Introductory Biology II 

The Biology Department is part of the College of Arts & Sciences, 214 Pray-Harrold