EMU School of Nursing Policies Related to COVID-19

  • May 6: Nurses Week Message

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    May 6, 2020
    Nurses Week Message


    Nurses Week traditionally begins in early May; 7 days prior to May 12th—Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Today, therefore, marks the start of a celebration of nurses around the world! Every year, during Nurses Week, I find myself admiring the courage and caring demonstrated by nurses everywhere. In this year, the Year of the Nurse and Midwife 2020, as declared by the World Health Organization, and in now the middle of a worldwide pandemic, words cannot express the love and gratitude the world has for nurses!


    Since last December with the Coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China my thoughts and prayers were with the nurses and healthcare providers working to save lives and limit the spread of the virus. And as the epidemic, now pandemic, spread across to Europe, we continued to see nurses rising to the challenge and providing knowledgeable and compassionate care. And finally, to the United States and the devastating effects Covid-19 has on many of our major cities, including Detroit right down the road from us. We have lost many.


    But I have also seen the determination and perseverance of nurses throughout these challenging times. Dr. San DiSanto, along with two of our BSN graduates, Kortrez King and Jimis Shukri, volunteered to go into the thick of things by heading to New York City and helping in horrendous conditions. And we had over 250 RN students and alumni volunteer to assist in Covid-19 testing—a true testament to the commitment of our graduates! Drs. Sherry Bumpus and Jennifer Avery quickly developed a plan for a free telehealth clinic at EMU School of Nursing and other pandemic responses plans to guide the School through its challenges.


    The hours that our faculty and staff worked to continue to offer classes to students at all levels of education is immeasurable. And the work continues as we plan for Summer and Fall semesters with information changing constantly. And yet, 148 of our students successfully completed their BSN degrees at the end of April 2020. Without everyone’s commitment, these would not have been possible.
    I have also seen firsthand, the devastation of Covid-19 on patients and their families (unable to visit) in the ICU. I have seen the energy and commitment of frontline nurses, and others behind the frontline supporting those nurses, to provide knowledgeable and compassionate care. I have seen the tired faces and bodies of nurses and healthcare providers, but I also see in their eyes, the sense of purpose and of pride in their efforts.


    Perhaps this year more than others, I am in awe of the remarkable contributions that nurses make to health care around the world and right here at home too. It has truly been an honor to observe students make the commitment to join our profession, nurses making their contributions in all facets of healthcare, and our EMU graduates and faculty for continuing the remarkable legacy of nursing!

    With my sincere appreciation for what all nurses do, CELEBRATE you and your colleagues! Go Eagles!

    Michael L. Williams, PhD, RN, CCRN, CNE Director, School of Nursing
    Eastern Michigan University

  • April 17: Email to Students in 300 Level Clinicals re: Change in  Rotations,

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    Dear Students,

    I hope you are all doing well. I want to first thank you for being patient with the schedule process this summer. I know it has been difficult for us, and I am sure it has been for you too.

    We are so happy that, at this point, we do not have to delay you a semester to wait for clinicals. As of now, your NUR 331 clinicals are set. I am in the process of getting spreadsheets ready for St. Joes for these clinicals.

    Your OB clinicals, however, will not be as anticipated. At this point, neither of the locations for NUR 305 are willing to let students into the mother/baby units. Part of this is because, at any point, they could have a patient with COVID-19, and you are not allowed to be on a unit with COVID patients. The other part is the vulnerability of this population.

    At this time, your NUR 305 clinical will consist of virtual and online activities. These would likely be on the day you are scheduled for, so continue to keep those days open. Also, it is possible that later in the summer, you may be allowed into the mother/baby units. That would be a pleasant surprise! If we did not configure the clinical this way, you would have been set back a semester. No other clinical opportunities were available for you.

    Next, your fall schedule will be changing. Since you are taking NUR 330/331 this summer, you obviously will not be taking it again in the fall. We will be changing your schedule to include NUR 306/307, 350/351, and 375. So some of the CRNs will be changing. As soon as we have them, we will contact you. And we are still unsure of what the clinicals will look like.

    Take care and stay well.

    Kathy Miller, DNP, RN, CNE
    Eastern Michigan University
    BSN Nursing Program Coordinator
    316 Marshall
    (734) 487-2341
    [email protected]
  • April 7: Email to 2nd Bachelor Students re: Peds this summer 

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    Dear Students,

    Unfortunately, we cannot offer pediatrics this summer due to COVID-19. In reviewing all of our options, we are moving NUR 330 and NUR 331 (adult health 1) to Summer for the 2nd degree students in place of NUR 306/307.

    • NUR 330 will be (5/4-7/10 Weds 8:30-11:45 a.m.) online, but synchronous, so keep that time set aside.

    We have asked for four clinical rotations for NUR 331:

    • Mondays 7-3:30 p.m. 5/4-7/24 (two sections)
    • Tuesdays 7-3:30 p.m. 5/4-7/24 (two sections)

    All four sections are requested at SJMH-AA units yet to be determined.

    We have closed NUR 306 and 307, so if you go to register for it, you will get the message that those are closed. This is why!

    We will keep you updated when we have the clinicals and CRNs for you to register with.

    Thank you and take care.

    Kathy Miller, DNP, RN, CNE
    Eastern Michigan University
    BSN Nursing Program Coordinator
    316 Marshall
    (734) 487-2341
    [email protected]

  • March 31: Letter to April BSN Graduates re: Licensing 

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    Dear Students,

    I am getting questions this morning regarding the changes in the licensing applications.

    There is contact information on the bottom of both the LARA sheets I posted for you yesterday.

    I called Marnie Wills this morning. Here is what she said:

    1. You do not have to have a Temporary License. If you already applied for the regular license, this is fine.
    2. If you wish to change from the regular application to the Temporary License application, see number 3.
    3. To change from regular to Temporary license, or vice versa, email [email protected] with your question and your application number. She assures me there are many people manning this email address, and you will receive a prompt answer.
    4. If you have any other questions about your license or application, use the same email.
    5. She did not have a sense of wait periods for NCLEX, since she works for LARA, and the NCLEX is through the NCSBN. But she has heard nothing new about wait times.

    I hope this helps.

    Take care and stay well!

    Kathy Miller, DNP, RN, CNE
    Eastern Michigan University
    BSN Nursing Program Coordinator
    316 Marshall
    (734) 487-2341
    [email protected]

  • March 29: DHHS Call for Help for State Psychiatric Hospitals

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    From: McCrimmon, Denise (DHHS) [email protected]
    Date: Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 11:10 a.m.
    Subject: Urgent Staffing Needs for Nursing Students at State Psychiatric Hospitals due to COVID-19
    To:

    Good Morning Deans,

    On behalf of Dr. George Mellos, Senior Executive Psychiatrist Director, for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, please review the attached letter requesting your assistance with urgent staffing needs due to COVID-19.

    Letter to Deans [PDF]

    Thank you,

    Denise McCrimmon

    Senior Executive Management Assistant to Matthew Rick
    Michigan Department of Health and Human Services
    Legal Affairs
    333 S. Grand
    Lansing, MI 48933
    517.284.4837

    Confidentiality Notice: This message, including any attachments, is intended solely for the use of the named recipient(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution of any confidential and/or privileged information contained in this e-mail is expressly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply e-mail and destroy any and all copies of the original message.

  • March 27: Letter to Students 

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    March 27, 2020

    Video introduction

    Dear Students,

    I am praying that you and your family are healthy as this pandemic is truly an unprecedented time in our lives. I am confident of my nursing and healthcare colleagues' expertise and resilience to rise above these challenges and persist in providing outstanding care. I, like you, worry about our frontline nurses and health care workers and their families. Many of you, our RN2BSN, MSN, and DNP students, along with our nurse aides/techs are frontline workers! Our good thoughts and gratitude are with you always!

    Human interaction limited to the household, Google Hangout, Skype, or Zoom truly misses the essence of why I became a nurse. I cannot say I've enjoyed all of my Zoom meetings (sometimes up to 6 hours a day), but the staff and faculty at the School of Nursing are working harder than ever to continue our operations and support you as a student! I am looking forward to working this weekend in the ICU to provide direct care to patients and to support my colleagues.

    Despite the challenges we are facing, there are several bright spots! Dr. Sherry Bumpus has been on WEMU twice to talk about the facts about COVID-19 and the role nurses are playing to combat it! Dr. Jennifer Avery has worked tirelessly with Dr. Bumpus to secure volunteers for the drive-through testing centers and other IHA related events. Our Dr. Liz Loomis is also an NP with IHA and has been working directly with patients and as a swabber at the drive-through testing tents. She, like many of our faculty are maintaining their practice through this crisis. Our faculty and staff have also worked tirelessly (actually, we're all tired) to respond to the online format for the near future, answer your questions, plan for graduation and summer courses, donate blood, and secure supplies for area health care agencies!

    The School of Nursing has created a medical supply drop-off for the EMU community at the Department of Public Safety office and have sent out requests to all EMU departments for help. Deanna Gower, our Supervisor of our Nursing Learning Resource Center, scoured our labs and we have donated gloves, gowns, face masks, bouffant hair coverings, Clorox wipes, N95 masks and much more. The Chemistry and Biology departments, along with the PA program, have likewise donated many supplies. EMU SON has delivered 3 truck loads of supplies to SJMH-AA. EMU cares about its community!

    We are hearing great things from the BSN clinical instructors on the progress students are making despite the move to virtual clinicals! Some of the RN2BSN capstone students and MSN students have been allowed to resume their clinical rotations so as not to affect their graduation or progression! Unfortunately, these must be made on a case-by-case basis, which is time-consuming, but the SON staff are here to help!

    Talk to your clinical instructor, faculty or faculty advisor if you are worried about anything in your studies! Your faculty advisors are available virtually, by phone or video, to listen to your fears, talk about your feelings, and provide you with accurate information, or get the information as we know it. I would strongly encourage you not to "withdraw" from a course without first talking to your instructors. While it is sometimes easier to withdraw, it really doesn't serve you well in the long run. And we are here to help you succeed!

    Wednesday was such a beautiful sunny day and I hope that you got outside! It was truly wonderful walking around our neighborhood and our lake! But it also reminded me that self-care is important! I'm sure you have found your routine altered significantly! Snacking on unhealthy food because you're bored, not exercising as you normally would, feeling obsessed with COVID-19 television news, social media, or your email are all very common right now. Here are some suggestions edited from Kristy Chunta, ANA Faculty Community page, for maintaining self-care:

    • Avoid added stress by establishing a daily routine/schedule. Don't be hard on yourself if you have interruptions during the day, technology problems, or other challenges that prevent you from being as efficient. Instead stay focused on what you can realistically complete and adjust your schedule as needed.
    • Find ways to stay active. The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes a week of activity or 30 minutes/day over five days. Your activity doesn't have to be completed all at one time. If it's easier to go for three 10-minute walks then do that. If possible, try to get outside while practicing social distancing.
    • Purchase healthy snacks. Many of us often snack on less healthy items when we're feeling stressed. Try to find healthy alternatives to avoid stress eating. Unhealthy foods can make your mood feel worse. If you're working online and need a snack look for a healthy fruit or vegetable alternative. Also, make sure you're drinking enough water and staying hydrated each day.
    • Focus on adequate sleep . Set a goal of 7-8 hours per night. Avoid staying up too late and if you can sneak in a nap. Naps have been shown to be very beneficial including decreasing your risk for heart disease!
    • Take a break from news and social media. Many of us want to stay current and knowledgeable about the virus and social media can provide a great way to connect with others while staying home. It's good to take a break from the news and technology to avoid feeling overwhelmed. Plan to disconnect for a designated time each day.
    • Find other ways to relax . This is a stressful time for all of us. Consider healthy ways to relax while you're at home. Here are just a few suggestions: Read a book, take a bath, meditate, pray, cook/bake, spend time with your family, enjoy your pet(s), organize a closet [this seems stressful to me], send a card or letter to a friend, sit on your porch, play a game, sing a song, or dance.

    YOUR mental health is important!

    It is very likely that you are fearful of COVID-19 for yourself as a frontline provider, for yourself as a nursing student, for you family or friends, and from the numerous reports on television and the internet! It is ok to feel this way! It is also ok to cry about things that are happening in your life (I've done quite a bit lately).

    The Center for Disease Prevention has resources related to coping with the stress of COVID-19. 

    We are in uncharted territory and we are still learning. Take time to be fully informed—the CDC has great information. Remember to use your evidence-based skills to evaluate what you read. Do rely on your knowledge and skills; standard precautions for all direct care and frequent, thorough hand-washing are basic skills that can help you and for those to whom you provide care. Encourage your family and friends in good practices and social distancing!

    Thank you for all you are doing to progress in your studies, care for your children and families, care for patients on the frontline, volunteering your time and energy. Indeed, "we are in this together."

    Michael L. Williams, PhD, RN, CCRN, CNE

    Director, School of Nursing

  • March 23: Letter to EMU-IHA Volunteers 

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    Hello EMU-IHA volunteers!

    First off, thank you thank you for your willingness to help with the EMU-IHA partnership to help meet our community's public health needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Second, I received the following message from IHA today to pass along to all of you:

    "Thank you! We have had an overwhelming response to the request for your folks to help us out, far more applicants than we will be able to use. Consequently, we have closed the posting and will not be accepting any new applications at this time. In addition, we won’t be able to hire, or even respond to everyone that has applied.

    For those who have been hired, they will be contacted by a member of the clinical team who is coordinating the testing sites to set up their schedule. They shouldn’t rely on the Sign-Up Genius for shifts. We are working to schedule your folks around our existing staff. Please ask your people to not show up at one of our sites unless they have received instructions.

    As we have said before, this is a very fluid process with a lot of moving parts, with changes continuing to occur almost hourly. We really appreciate all the help you have provided to get through this crisis!"

    So - if you get an e-mail from sign-up genius to remind you of your "shift," do not plan on attending unless you have received a call from IHA to confirm it. That being said, this is only the beginning of a long marathon response. We are continuing to work with IHA to set up some telehealth initiatives in addition to other in-person sites to help screen those at high risk. We are also planning for the potential that our area hospitals may be overrun with COVID patients, resulting in less critical patients being displaced and in need of care. As we identify solutions and confirm clear needs for volunteers, we will reach back out with project details.

    Thank you once again for your willingness to help our community in its time of need, and also for your continued patience as we get everything up and running!

    Dr. Avery and Dr. Bumpus

    Jennifer Sjostedt Avery PhD, RN, GNP-BC
    Assistant Professor and Associate Director for Graduate Nursing Studies
    Eastern Michigan University
    School of Nursing

  • March 21: Letter to Student Volunteers 

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    Good afternoon everyone-

    As of this afternoon, after deleting some accidental repeat applications, we have had 252 students, alumni, and/or faculty sign up to help with IHA. THANK YOU ALL! Gearing up to our first volunteers starting on Monday, I wanted to reach out and share some information that I got from IHA today as well as provide some documentation instructions for our student volunteers:

    1. IHA will contact you if you have been assigned the shift that you have signed up for on the sign-up genius website (given that the testing sites are staffed with a mix of our volunteers and their regular employees and also limited on amount of PPE, they will either need all volunteers for that day or only some). If you signed up for a shift on Monday (3/23) or Tuesday (3/24) and have not received a call from IHA regarding that shift, then that means that you are not assigned to either of those days at this moment. Currently, they have both testing sites fully staffed for Monday and Tuesday. They will be contacting people starting Monday 3/23 to start filling the shifts on the rest of the days this week. Please do not just show up at the testing site without a call from IHA saying to go as they will not be prepared for you and will turn you away (I know the uncertainty of planning for shifts right now is frustrating, we're working with them on it).
    1. If you filled out the employment application and have not been contacted by IHA to do the employee on-boarding (drug screen and paper work), please give them some time. They are not used to having such a high volume of applications at one time but are trying to keep the turnover time as short as they can.
    1. Zipnosis is on indefinite hold at the moment, IHA has switched up assignments of their internal providers and are wanting to possibly involve their EHR which we do not have access to at this time. So if you signed up for a zipnosis shift in the near future, I am sorry but you will not be needed at this moment. If/When this changes as demands grow, we will let you know.
    1. We are still in discussion with IHA regarding other needs still such as the telephone triage/information line and potential screening needs for large essential employers, and we will let you know when those opportunities are ready for volunteers.
    1. Documentation instruction for student volunteers:
    2. Please enter all hours that you work into Project Concert (even if only a certain number are currently being counted towards what you need in a particular course or program)
    3. To enter your hours, log into Project Concert (link at the bottom of the nursing homepage) using your my.emich log in information
    4. Click on "Experience" on the left side and then "new" you will be entering the experience as "Hours"
    5. Enter the start/end time of your shift for the experience date start and end times.
    6. Everything you need (aside from the course/instructor) starts with COVID-19, so the site is "COVID-19 testing site," the clinical instructor or preceptor is "COVID-19 IHA Personnel." If you are an MSN student and not yet enrolled in a clinical course, choose "Other" for your course and me for your instructor.
    7. In the notes, you can comment about your duties and a rough estimate of how many people you swabbed that day (if swabbing).

    Here is a video walkthrough, to the zoom session that I did with a couple students earlier today (apologies for quality and one of my kids in the background a bit, I don't have any editing software on my home computer):

    Finally, repeat details from my prior messages: if you did not already do so, in order to volunteer, please make sure to complete the employment application with IHA and sign up for shifts (links below) that you might be able to work: so we can begin the expedited on-boarding process. If you have any problems with the employment application, please email [email protected] with the subject line *EMU Triage Support.

    • The Arbor Park address is 4940 W. Clark Road Suite #100 Ypsilanti, MI 48197
    • This sign-up has roles for nursing students and those with RN or greater licensure.
    • The Bright East address is 5505 Old US 23 Suite 100 Brighton MI 48116
    • This sign-up has roles for nursing students and those with RN or greater licensure.

    Again, thank you all for your willingness to help and your patience with the fluidity of what IHA needs from us. Have a good rest of your weekend!

    Dr. Avery and Dr. Bumpus

    Jennifer Sjostedt Avery PhD, RN, GNP-BC

    Assistant Professor and Associate Director for Graduate Nursing Studies

    Eastern Michigan University
    School of Nursing
    j[email protected]

  • March 20: Letter to Students 

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    March 20, 2020

    Dear Nursing Students,

    There are currently 1,136 of you registered for nursing courses this Winter semester with 503 of you in clinical rotations and 606 of you taking fully online courses (lucky you!). We have made many changes in a quick manner and continue to work (remotely) every day to answer your questions to the very best of our ability and with current information. Your success in our program including progression and graduation are utmost in our minds along with continuing to provide a high-quality educational experience despite the current challenges to all of us!

    Each of you is a unique individual, following the program of study of one of our 12 programs! As a result, providing information specific to each of you is difficult. I do truly appreciate your questions and comments to the information we have been providing—in most cases, with a little clarity of questions, you have all been very supportive of the School and our leadership team. Again, thank you!

    In order to respond in a manner that communicates specifics, but in grouped fashion, you will note the following information updates are attached:

    • BSN Level 2 Updates
    • BSN Level 3 Updates
    • BSN Level 4 Updates
    • Collaborative Student Updates (WCC, HFC, MCCC)
    • RN2BSN Online Student Updates
    • Graduate Student Updates

    As you know, registration has been delayed; but Summer registration schedules were sent to summer students as of today. The one thing we don’t know are the locations of ANY clinical rotations! In speaking with the clinical agencies, they are simply overwhelmed and haven’t had time to respond to our requests (I don’t anticipate a response until mid-April).

    As more information becomes available for our IHA collaboration and/or managing a phone bank for telephone triage, I will have that forwarded to you. Also, I apologize if there was confusion about the drive-through testing options—unlicensed students cannot and are not trained to be frontline in the testing process. Nurses (most of our faculty, graduate students, R2B students and over 100 of our alumni have volunteered) would be conducting the swabbings! The CDC will be providing all PPE needed and strict standards are being used. Students would be needed to maintain traffic control, transport collected specimens to the lab, and other non-direct care activities (for those of you in NUR 451L4—this is community health in action!). For those of you in other courses, this is a great observational experience of community health before you get to those courses (keep a journal)!

    If you do have any questions, please do not hesitate to email myself, Dr. Bumpus ([email protected]) or to [email protected].

    Michael L. Williams, PhD, RN, CCRN, CNE

    Director, School of Nursing
    [email protected]

  • March 20: BSN Level 2 Update 

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    BSN Program Level 2 Updates

    Level 2 Winter semester is always challenging even without the stress of a pandemic! So first and foremost, take a few deep breaths and cut yourself some slack! It won’t look pretty, but you’ll get through it!

    NURS 250: Dr. Pauli has been in contact with you regarding shifting course materials to the fully online format. Given her expertise, I am confident the course will be completed successfully.

    NURS 251L4: Dr. Pauli, as the lead faculty of NUR 251L4, has been in contact with your clinical instructors and has provided them with alternative options to meet the desired course outcomes. Deanna Gower and the lab staff have worked with you to distribute supplies so you could work at home and virtually with the lab instructors. This isn’t ideal; but thank you to everyone to be innovative and make it work. I am hopeful that you can all complete your clinical course in these alternative methods. However, I did review verified clinical hours in Project Concert and some of you appear to be very short hours. Clinical instructors will be working with you, as individuals, to determine if you will receive an “I” grade and be required to complete additional clinical hours in August before progressing in the program. This is mostly due to absences prior to the suspension of clinicals. Clinical instructors have the ultimate decision as to your final grade or whether an “I” is awarded.

    NURS 260: We have heard from Professor Harrison that she has moved her materials to fully online and that you will be taking your exams online. We are working with E-Learning to determine the best method for “proctoring” online tests. However, I would like to remind you that nursing is the most trusted profession for a reason—our ethics! Cheating and/or sharing questions or answers with other students (even future students) is not to the standards of our profession. If possible, we are looking to move to an online testing platform where you are proctored via webcam—this may or may not happen this semester, but it is best practices for online exams.

    NURS 270: Dr. Newberry, as an expert teacher with online teaching experience will successfully move everything online. I am confident you will have a fun, yet rigorous, pharmacology knowledge by the time you have completed the course.

    ATI Proctored Exams: We have met with all lead faculty about proctored ATI exams. We are investigating other ATI products that may be substituted for the proctored exams, given we will not be back on campus any time soon! I am confident we will find an option that will not delay your progression in the program. You will hear more from your individual faculty!

    2nd Degree Students: For those of you who are planning to complete NUR 304, 305L4, 306, 307L4 and 372 this summer, we cannot get confirmation from clinical sites whether clinical rotations will occur or not. One option is to delay the start of Summer from May 4th to June 1st (start one month late and run through August rather than May through July). This is not ideal but seems better than canceling summer altogether and ultimately delaying you 2 semesters to graduate. Rest assured that I will do everything in my power to get you started by May 4th—but know that we may need your flexibility through the entire summer.

  • March 20: BSN Level 3 Update 

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    BSN Program Level 3 Updates

    Level 3 courses are challenging in their own right! Managing two separate clinicals and managing your time truly prepares you for the professional work-life balance you’ll need after graduation.

    A Word About Academic Dishonesty: We are working with E-Learning to determine the best method for “proctoring” online tests. However, I would like to remind you that nursing is the most trusted profession for a reason—our ethics! Cheating and/or sharing questions or answers with other students (even future students) is not to the standards of our profession. If possible, we are looking to move to an online testing platform where you are proctored via webcam—this may or may not happen this semester, but it is best practices for online exams. YOU can simply be ethical and do the right thing—we are counting on you!

    A Word About Clinical Hours: Each lead faculty is working with your clinical instructors to create alternative assignments (virtual, case studies, papers, video reviews, etc) to meet your course outcomes. These alternative strategies will count toward your clinical hours for completing each course. However, I did review verified clinical hours in Project Concert and some of you appear to be very short hours. Clinical instructors will be working with you, as individuals, to determine if you will receive an “I” grade and be required to complete additional clinical hours in August before progressing in the program. This is mostly due to absences prior to the suspension of clinicals. Clinical instructors have the ultimate decision as to your final grade or whether an “I” is awarded. If you’re behind in logging your clinical hours, and getting instructor approval, now is the time to get them updated!

    NURS 304: Dr. Hopkins is back with you. Thank you to Michelle Gee for pitching in for the first six weeks. Dr. Hopkins has taught classes online and provided exams online, so I assume the transition from face-to-face should be smooth for you.

    NURS 305L4: Dr. Hopkins, as the lead faculty of NUR 305L4, has been in contact with your clinical instructors and has provided them with alternative options to meet the desired course outcomes. Your clinical instructors also have ideas about alternative assignments that can help you meet the course objectives. Thank you to everyone who is making this work. I am hopeful that you can all complete your clinical course in these alternative methods.

    NURS 306: Dr. Angela Lukomski has taught for many years with us and has expertise in teaching fully online courses. I am confident that she will make your transition to online relatively painless (although I do remember how challenging Peds was!).

    NURS 307L4: Dr. Lukomski has been in touch with your clinical instructors and has provided alternative methods to meet your course outcomes.

    NURS 372: Dr. Cathy Meldrum, as you know, is an awesome research instructor. She is quite capable of moving your coursework to the online format and assisting you in meeting the course outcomes. Since she has taught mostly face-to-face for us, I do ask for your patience as she becomes more familiar with Canvas and its testing capabilities.

    NURS 330: Dr. DeBello has taught many courses fully online. She has much expertise in shifting her content to fully online as well as distance testing.

    NURS 331L4: Dr. DeBello has sent multiple options to your clinical instructor for alternative strategies to meeting your course objectives. These instructors also have a wealth of information that can share with you and ultimately evaluate your ability to progress to NUR 405L4.

    NURS 350: Professor Washington and Dr. Hughesdon copied me on the message that they have sent to you regarding strategies to successfully complete NUR 350 online. I also know that Shadow Health is one way to help you achieve generalist competency in psych/mental health nursing.

    NURS 351L4: Professor Washington has also sent many resources to your clinical instructors for alternative methods to meet your clinical course objectives.

    NURS 375W: This course has not been taught fully online; however, its sister course (NURS 365W for RN2BSN online students) has been online for 5 years. Making this switch should be relatively easy for our faculty teaching this course.

    ATI Proctored Exams: We have met with all lead faculty about proctored ATI exams. We are investigating other ATI products that may be substituted for the proctored exams, given we will not be back on campus any time soon! I am confident we will find an option that will not delay your progression in the program. You will hear more from your individual faculty!

  • March 20: BSN Level 4 Update 

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    BSN Program Level 4 Updates

    Level 4 courses are culminating courses in your program. As a faculty who taught level 4 for years, I can still feel the “senioritis” of you and your classmates! But, before you can graduate, we need to have you complete the level 4 courses successfully and then take the 3-day NCLEX review course (this may be virtual)! The good news—you’re almost there!

    A Word About Academic Dishonesty: We are working with E-Learning to determine the best method for “proctoring” online tests. However, I would like to remind you that nursing is the most trusted profession for a reason—our ethics! Cheating and/or sharing questions or answers with other students (even future students) is not to the standards of our profession. If possible, we are looking to move to an online testing platform where you are proctored via webcam—this may or may not happen this semester, but it is best practices for online exams. YOU can simply be ethical and do the right thing—we are counting on you!

    A Word About Clinical Hours: Each lead faculty is working with your clinical instructors to create alternative assignments (virtual, case studies, papers, video reviews, etc) to meet your course outcomes. These alternative strategies will count toward your clinical hours for completing each course. However, I did review verified clinical hours in Project Concert and some of you appear to be very short hours. Clinical instructors will be working with you, as individuals, to determine if you will receive an “I” grade and be required to complete additional clinical hours in August before progressing in the program. This is mostly due to absences prior to the suspension of clinicals. Clinical instructors have the ultimate decision as to your final grade or whether an “I” is awarded. If you’re behind in logging your clinical hours, and getting instructor approval, now is the time to get them updated!

    NURS 404: Dr. Fox has taught online courses and is working to move NUR 404 fully online with online exams. I want to remind you about academic dishonesty—do you want a nurse who cheats his/her way through nursing school to provide care to your child, your mom or your grandfather? We are counting on you to uphold that standards of our profession!

    NURS 405L4: Dr. Fox, as the lead faculty of NUR 405L4, has been in contact with your clinical instructors and has provided them with alternative options to meet the desired course outcomes. Your clinical instructors also have ideas about alternative assignments that can help you meet the course objectives. Thank you to everyone who is making this work. I am hopeful that you can all complete your clinical course in these alternative methods.

    NURS 450: Dr. Jenni Hoffman has taught NUR 453 Community Health Nursing for RNs fully online and can easily adapt NURS 450 to the online format. She has been delivering NUR 450 exams online for some time.

    NURS 451L4: Dr. Hoffman, as the lead faculty, has been in touch with your clinical instructors and has provided alternative methods to meet your course outcomes. If the IHA call center and drive through testing centers can be put in place soon, there will be options for you to assist (without direct care of PUIs (person’s under investigation for COVID-19).

    NURS 475: Professor Washington, along with Drs. Miller and Hughesdon have taught courses fully online. I have offered to all 3 of them IF they so choose I can “join” the via Zoom meetings in your class to talk about processes for NCLEX-RN (I can often dispel rumors too.)

    ATI Proctored Exams: ATI Proctored Exams: We have met with all lead faculty about proctored ATI exams. We are investigating other ATI products that may be substituted for the proctored exams, given we will not be back on campus any time soon! I am confident we will find an option that will not delay your progression in the program. You will hear more from your individual faculty! We do not yet know what May will bring and whether the live ATI-NCLEX will stay as planned, or if it too will need to be virtual; either way keep those dates and times available (on the SON website).

    Convocation: Given that commencement has been postponed indefinitely, the School of Nursing must also cancel our convocation (pinning) ceremony. When we hear what the university plans are for commencement, we will decide about convocation.

    On-Time Graduation: Will you graduate on time? I usually tell students that there is ONE right answer for every NCLEX-style questions and that answer is ‘it depends’.” Given that nursing is so context-specific (age, gender, culture, disease, etc), it’s hard for experts to definitively give one answer. In this case, my answer “I certainly hope so and I certainly plan for it to unfold as such.” What does that mean? Basically, we are counting on you to successfully pass your didactic courses. We are also counting on your clinical instructors to verify that you are 1) currently passing your clinical courses (and if not, would more clinical time allow you to be successful), and 2) at what level (A through C grade). Clinical instructors can award an “I” (incomplete) for those students who are not meeting course outcomes and these individuals would ultimately need to make up hours in the summer semester. We are also counting on the fact that you have been keeping your Project Concert clinical hours up-to-date and they have been verified by your instructor.

    **After speaking with your lead faculty yesterday and all faculty today, I am extremely confident that if you complete the requirements of your courses, you will graduate on time!

  • March 20: Collaborative Program Updates (WCC, HFCC, MCC) 

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    Collaborative BSN Program Updates

    Welcome to EMU from Washtenaw Community College, Henry Ford College, and Monroe County Community College for Summer 2020 courses! This update is intended to provide information as we know it, at this minute! We hope you find it helpful and do welcome any questions you have! Thank you for your patience as much of what is happening in the US and the world is uncertain at this time!

    Summer 2020 Collab Courses: This summer, we plan to offer many courses to 1st summer, 2nd summer and 3rd summer students from each of our community college collaborative partners! We will be offering some courses (NUR 450 and NUR 451L4) for our first time in summer for collaborative students.

    NUR 220: Typically this is offered as a course with 50% online and 50% in seat. This course may be adjusted so all content is delivered online with some in lab time for health assessment practice and check-offs. This could change as the world changes.

    NUR 275: Typically this course is also offered 50/50. However, faculty teaching these courses are very capable of reformatting it to a mostly online course (with a few face-to-face sessions).

    NUR 300W: This course has been taught fully online for our RN2BSN students; it could easily be adjusted if needed.

    NUR 372: Nursing research, NUR 372, has not traditionally been taught online. Its R2B companion course, NUR 374, is available in a fully online format, so this adjustment should be done relatively easily

    NUR 375W: This course has not been taught full online to date, but its R2B companion course NUR 365W has is available in a fully online format, so this adjustment should be done relatively easily.

    NUR 450: This course has not been taught full online to date, but its R2B companion course NUR 453 has is available in a fully online format, so this adjustment should be done relatively easily

    NUR 451L4: This is a clinical course—requiring 90 “in field” hours. Depending on the ongoing pandemic, working on health departments would be a great learning experience!

    NUR 478 & 479: These are elective courses and have been offered fully online in the past and were planned to be offered fully online this summer.

    Thank you to students from HFC that have let us know that HFC’s winter semester overlaps 1 week with the start of our summer semester. We will notify faculty of this overlap and ask them to make adjusts to the first week to accommodate that. Those of you at WCC and MCCC, our planned start date is May 4th, so if you have any issues, please let us know as well.

    We are planning to move forward with our summer courses. The exact format is (face-to-face, 50/50, fully online) for the didactic courses is still to be determined. The NUR 451L4 clinical is community health and there will be plenty of non-direct care experiences available to meet the course outcomes.

  • March 20: RN2BSN Online Update 

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    RN2BSN Online Program Updates

    The best news with the RN2BSN online program—it’s already ONLINE! So those of you taking courses, prior to NUR 483L4 (capstone), continue to do the work you’re doing and making progress. We do fully understand if you need to step out due to the pandemic for a half semester or whole semester. Your services as a practicing RN at this time are crucial….but don’t forget about us or accomplishing your BSN goal!

    NUR 483L4 Capstone Course: As you know, I made the decision to suspend all clinical rotations, including the RN2BSN and the MSN clinical courses. It was a decision not taken lightly and I feel strongly that even pre-licensure students can provide care to non-COVID-19 patients lightening your load! Unfortunately, some clinical agencies were restricting students and it was therefore easier to suspend ALL clinical rotations and preceptorships.

    For those of you in NUR 483L4 that started March 4, 2020; we are evaluating options for you. Ideally, we would like you to remain in the course if feasible! After we halted all clinical and precepted courses, we have heard that some preceptors, some agencies and some students would like to simply plow through and finish their degree—hooray for you! Another option is to provide leniency in our awarding of “incomplete” grades if you simply cannot proceed at this time. You could simply “pause” and return when you are ready. You are going to have to decide what YOU want to do (forge on and graduate or pause and graduate later).

    For those of you wanting to forge ahead, we have sent an email to your 483L4 instructors and have asked them to contact your preceptor to verify that you are still allowed to be in their facility at this time and they are still willing to precept you. Please note: Michigan Medicine and Bronson Health System have prohibited all students at this time—clinical rotations and preceptorships — so if you’re at Michigan Medicine or Bronson, you will need to ask for the incomplete or negotiate with your NUR 483L4 faculty that you can complete the course without additional hours at that site.

    If you are interested in reaching an incomplete at this point, reach out to your faculty!

    For those of you with NUR483L4 coming up….please note that preceptor agreements, legal affiliations (if required), ACEAPP approvals, and clinical agency approvals may be delayed on the part of the clinical agency (I’m sure you’ve seen the chaos in your own agency).

    Convocation: Given that commencement has been postponed indefinitely, the School of Nursing must also cancel our convocation (pinning) ceremony. When we hear what the university plans are for commencement, we will decide about convocation.

    THANK YOU for your patience during this stressful time for all of us! Stay safe and healthy!

  • March 20: MSN/DNP Program Update 

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    MSN/DNP Program Updates

    The DNP program is by far the “easiest” program to provide information to at this point! Since the courses were/are primarily online, they will convert to fully online with virtual technology. Thank you for your cooperation as we all work through this change!

    By now, your faculty should have contacted you to move your in-class content to fully online. Thank you for your cooperation and patience as well! The most challenging aspect is for those of you in your clinical courses; more is explained below.

    MSN Clinicals: As you know, I made the decision to suspend all clinical rotations, including the RN2BSN and the MSN clinical courses. It was a decision not taken lightly and I feel strongly that even pre-licensure students can provide care to non-COVID-19 patients lightening your load! Unfortunately, some clinical agencies were restricting students and it was therefore easier to suspend ALL clinical rotations and preceptorships.

    For those of you in your graduate clinical preceptorships; we are evaluating options for you. Some of your preceptors, and their agencies, are still willing to have you attend your clinicals. Michigan Medicine and Bronson Health System have prohibited all students at this time—clinical rotations and preceptorships — so if you’re at Michigan Medicine or Bronson, you cannot continue your rotation until further notice from me (this includes all R2B preceptorships, NP and CNS preceptorships as well). For those of you wanting to forge ahead, we are sending out a separate form. We will need your preceptor to complete that form to verify that you are still allowed to be in their facility at this time and they are still willing to precept you.

    I do know that Dr. Jackson and Dr. Avery have been in contact, as well as your clinical faculty, to discuss options. They have made some adjustments already—including being flexible with regard to MD, NP, or PA preceptoring, working over breaks to accumulate hours (with our notification and permission), allowing you to move hours between semesters (if needed). I know you are in good hands, as I haven’t received any “panic” emails from our MSN students—so thank you to Drs. Jackson, Seurynck and Avery for promptly responding to student concerns!

    Also, as you know EMU is partnering with IHA to create a phone back, Zipnosis, drive through testing center and many faculty, part time instructors, YOU, and alumni have agreed to help. Drs. Avery and Bumpus have this well in hand—thank you both! I also know that you are busy in your primary employment (and probably being asked to do even more), trying to stay healthy yourself and now have your kids at home to ‘help’ you with your studying! Indeed, these are trying times for all of us. We are committed to your success and will work with you as much as possible to help you meet your goals.

    Thank you for your patience during this stressful time for all of us! Stay safe and healthy!

  • March 17: Letter to Students 

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    March 17, 2020

    Dear faculty, instructors and students,

    As you know, we have been monitoring closely the COVID-19 situation. We have received CDC, MSHD, WCHD recommendations. Additionally, we have received information from the Michigan Bureau of Professional Licensing and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing indicating that nursing students are necessary for the provision of care in health care agencies.

    While there is uncertainty and anxiety regarding COVID-19, there is even more confusion regarding response and communication from health care agencies to students, clinical instructors and to our School of Nursing leadership. Therefore, I am suspending all direct care clinical experiences effective as of 12 midnight. These suspensions include all undergraduate clinical rotations as well as R2B NUR 483L4 and MSN preceptorships.

    This decision was not taken lightly as this may affect progression in the program and/or graduation. Tomorrow, our leadership team we will be working through these issues and communicating them to students as soon as possible. ALL students should remain available during the clinical hours for virtual "gatherings" through goggle hangout, facetime or zoom meetings or reassigned non-direct patient care experiences. Students who are not available during their scheduled clinical hours will be held to the clinical attendance policy standards. Your clinical instructors will be in contact with you about these meetings.

    Clinical instructors should work to meet with students virtually and use case studies, group work, or virtual case studies to complete course requirements. Your lead faculty will be in touch regarding options for completing the course. Drs. Bumpus, Avery, and Deanna Gower have developed some resources we will share with clinical instructors that should assist you in meeting course outcomes in this manner. I will be sending an email to all clinical instructors asking for information on 1) clinical hours remaining based on your current schedule and 2) clinical competence, clinical concerns, and the impact of cancellation on individual student progression.

    Also, Drs. Sherry Bumpus and Jennifer Avery have been working with IHA and the WCHD to transition from direct care clinical rotations to drive through screening/testing for COVID-19 and other screening strategies. Both agencies can use our assistance as they become busier. Students and clinical instructors, during their clinical hours, would be expected to participate in these events (traffic control, running tests, etc) if notified. Students who are RNs (and alumni) can offer assistance with telephone triage at the call center, and NP alumni, faculty, and lecturers can perform “Zipnosis”. As soon as IHA and EMU can mobilize these services, we will announce them. We are also working to provide a COVID-19 webpage (on the SON website) where we can provide you with nursing-specific updates as well. We hope to have that up and running by tomorrow at the latest.

    R2B and MSN preceptorships are also postponed. We will be working individually with R2B students completing their capstone course. One option is to allow for a late withdrawal without financial penalty (which is a higher administrative decision which we have forwarded upward). Another option is to allow faculty to assign an incomplete due to COVID-19 circumstances (we are also looking into this option). We will be working with individual MSN students on options for making up hours, moving hours across semesters, or finishing current clinical hours in the summer or fall semester. In all cases, we are committed to helping you complete your education!

    Thank you for your patience! We appreciate all of your emails and questions and we apologize for the challenging communication regarding clinicals! Nothing more frustrating than showing up and being turned away! Thank you for your commitment to your education and your commitment to the health of US citizens! I fear we will need you (at all levels) more and more in the very near future. Stay well.

    Michael

  • March 16: Letter to Students

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    March 16, 2020

    Dear EMU Nursing Students,

    Thank you for your continued patience and understanding during this extraordinary time! My special thanks to Dr. Sherry Bumpus who stepped in last week during my family emergency. Dr. Bumpus and the entire School of Nursing team have done an outstanding job! I am so proud of their efforts and profusely thank them! This update is provided to give you the latest information.

    In Person to Online Classes: Last week, as you know, in-person classes were transitioned to various formats to accommodate student completion of courses. Faculty have been working to transition face-to-face classes to online. Deanna Gower, and our lab staff, stepped in and did a herculean job of checking off multiple students on Foley catheter insertions and made kits for students to complete the remaining skills in their homes with online discussion/google hangout meetings; so far this has worked successfully. As I noted, on campus “gatherings” are canceled and classes continue—simply in a different format. Thank you for cooperation and patience as this transition occurs.

    Clinical Rotations: Clinical rotations are a completely different situation. I reached out to our key clinical agency partners in February and inquired about potential clinical cancellations. At that time, the clinical agencies were not anticipating restricting students; in fact, students were viewed as an important asset during this pandemic. We have been blessed with outstanding clinical partners and have been in daily (if not twice a day) contact with them all last week. Some agencies have interpreted Governor Whitmer’s executive order limiting “visitors” to their agency to include nursing students. This has since been clarified. Today, we received the following message, “As such, the Bureau of Professional Licensing would consider student nurses necessary for the provision of medical care or the support of activities of daily living. Their entry into the facility should be contingent upon whether or not they are showing symptoms of respiratory infection, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, or sore throat; and contact in the last 14 days with someone with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19.” The American Association of Colleges of Nursing as of March 12, have provided some information to Schools of Nursing and “ suggest that for now, other than limiting direct care of COVID-19 patients, clinical students continue their roles as part of the care team.”

    Nevertheless, some health care agencies have opted to restrict nursing students at this time.

    The agencies that are restricting students (as of today) include:

    Clinical instructors will be working with lead faculty to create alternative learning experiences to meet your clinical objectives if you are in one of these sites. This may include virtual connection during your expected clinical hours.

    All other health care agencies remain committed to nursing student participation in the provision of care and ongoing educational experiences at this time. Students should expect to be “screened” upon entry to our clinical agencies. We have discovered today, that “screeners” don’t always have the most current information and have turned students away. Please do not simply walk away. You, and your clinical instructor, may want to meet at the screening site and enter together. Do stay on site until your clinical instructor dismisses you.

  • March 14: Letter to Students

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    March 14, 2020

    Dear All,

    Thank you for those of you who have reached out to me today about your clinicals. I appreciate that the reactions that we are seeing in the community are unprecedented (empty shelves at big box retailers, etc.). These experiences are heightening our fears and concerns. We are nurses, or are going to be nurses. We have a lot to offer our communities and it will be nurses that get all of our communities through this trying time.

    It is important that we stay calm, that we work together, and that we limit and correct misinformation. Please review this website from the World Health Organization: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public: Myth busters.

    The University and the School of Nursing are aware of Gov. Whitmer's executive order that prohibits visitors who are not necessary from entering health care facilities. We are waiting for clarification from the Michigan State Board of Nursing and our Accrediting body (AACN) on this statement. As of this morning, our hospital partners are still welcoming nursing students. In some states, calls have been put out for all licensed nurses to come to hospitals, be oriented, and available in the coming days. Similarly, nursing students are being recognized as a valuable resource for assisting with care of patients without COVID-19 who still need care.

    Nurses are the single largest group of healthcare providers in the world and we are being called to help. Within the next 48 hours you (nurses and nursing students) will be receiving information about EMU SoN's partnership with IHA and how you can help. We need nurses for telephone triage, for zipnosis (reviewing surveys to determine who needs to be tested), and for assisting at drive-thru testing sites. I hope you will consider how you might be able to help our community. There is a place for everyone.

    In the interim, I will send out updated information about students in the clinical setting as soon as I have it. For now, please plan on Monday clinicals as expected and follow up with your clinical instructors.

    In health,

    Sherry Bumpus, Ph.D, FNP-BC, Director of Nursing Operations

    Eastern Michigan University School of Nursing 311 Marshall Building Ypsilanti, MI 48197 [email protected].

  • March 12: AACN Response to COVID-19

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  • March 11: Letter to Students

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    March 11, 2020

    Nursing COVID-19 Student Class Suspension Updates

    Dear Students,

    Thank you all for reaching out to me. I absolutely understand your questions and concerns about the COVID-19 situation. This is a stressful situation. Please be assured, that we are working with experts in our discipline and following Board of Nursing recommendations, as well as collaborating with our College of Health and Human Service leaders, their leaders across campus, and with the Health Dept.

    Below I am summarizing details that I hope are useful and help clarify issues. The largest of which is related to clinical hours. We have been in contact with our clinical agencies over the last 3 weeks, and multiple times today. They have been in contact with the Health Dept during their decisions as well. When or if it becomes inappropriate to have students in the clinical setting, we will be made aware, and cancel agency clinical hours.

    As a reminder, No student or clinical instructor may care for a patient on any isolation precautions and no student may attend clinical with respiratory illness or fever > 100.4.

    Please know that the University is not closed. Rather the university is suspending face-to-face classes on campus. There are currently no cases on campus. Per the CDC guidelines, closing campus is a measure of increasing social-distancing to promote health and decrease spread in the community. Please read on for more specifics about the rest of the semester - as we understand and anticipate right now.

    General

    • Our University is not closed, our campus is closed. Online classes are continuing as normal without interruption.

    Classes

    • Face-to-Face classes on campus are suspended through March 31
    • All students who have a class tomorrow (Thursday), Friday, or on the weekend should expect communication from their instructors regarding what you should be doing for this weeks class. For example, you may be assigned readings, videos, discussion, have exams online, etc. for the remainder of this week in preparation for resuming classes online Monday.

    Course Conversion

    • By Monday you should receive a plan from your instructors regarding the remainder of the semester.
    • We will be updating syllabi with language specific to managing courses during a public health emergency.
    • Many of your courses will use synchronous online videoconferencing (e.g.google hangouts, conferences in canvas, zoom).
      • You will need access to a computer and internet to finish your course. If this is an issue please contact the Disability Resource Center and myself.
      • You can expect to be made aware of the dates that you will need to be live online for class.
      • You can expect that synchronous course will take place at the same time as your previous face-to-face course when required.
    • You may be required to take exams online using a virtual exam monitoring system that will require the use of a webcam.

    Clinicals

    • Clinical courses are part of the "laboratory" classes that the President refers to and are different from academic courses.
    • We have been in contact with the academic agencies today and students are still expected to attend clinical. Faculty with clinical groups are expected to be on the units with their students.
      • As a reminder, students, EMU faculty, FTL and PTL are not permitted to care for patients on isolation precautions.
    • If you have clinical tomorrow, Friday or on the weekend, you should receive additional communication from your instructor.
    • You should anticipate that there will be more cases of COVID-19 and at some point that we will no longer be allowed in the hospital when the hospital and health dept. deem it unsafe.
    • If you have respiratory symptoms or a fever (>100.4) may not attend clinical and must contact your clinical instructor.
    • We will notify you if and as soon as, the climate changes.

    Simulation

    • We are still able to have classes at the simulation center. If you are scheduled for sim tomorrow, you are expected to be there.

    Campus

    • Do not come to campus

    Lab

    • The majority of level 2 students worked with Deanna Gower today. If you did not, please reach out to her by email.
    • We will be working out plans for Level 3 and Level 4 remediation soon and will communicate that with you when the protocol is ready.

    Grad

    • All grad courses are being moved online. Your instructors will contact you regarding tomorrows class and future classes.
    • All grad students may continue clinicals at this time
    • We are reaching out to all preceptors this week to open 2-way communication. Please talk with you preceptors about the clinics plans related to students and discuss with your course faculty.

    R2B

    • Classes as normal, no change for this week.
    • We will be reaching out to all students in 483L4 and preceptors to open 2-way communication.

    I hope this addresses many of your questions and concerns. Please email me as you think of more. I will update you as I know more. Plans change by the hour and these may as well. I appreciate your patience and collaboration.

    Dr Bumpus

  • March 11: COVID-19 School of Nursing Policy

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    March 11, 2020

    Dear School of Nursing Students, Faculty, Staff, Full & Part-Timer Lecturers:

    The Coronavirus (COVID-19) is now considered a worldwide pandemic. It is receiving much attention in the media and is being closely monitored by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the various state health departments, and the World Health Organization. We want to make you aware of resources for you as students, you as instructors, and to share with the public. I anticipate that the university will be sending out an announcement about on campus events shortly.

    The EMU on communicable diseases/pandemics is primarily focused on in-classroom activities and campus events. The policy doesn’t specifically address concerns of health profession students, so this information is intended to do so. First and foremost, no EMU student should caring for any patient that requires precautions that include the use of an N-95 mask or Power Air-Purified Respiratory (PAPR) as these require special training of which clinical agencies do not provide to our students.

    To date, none of our clinical agencies have restricted students; so until further notice, we are asking that all clinical instructors and students attend clinical courses; even if the university closes on campus class. The School of Nursing faculty is prepared to move all on campus classes to an online format to prevent any gaps in your learning! IF the clinical agency restricts students, we will notify you as soon as we are notified.

    Skills Lab: For those of you in NUR 251, Deanna Gower and our lab staff are working to move things to an online format and/or provide supplies you may use in the home while on campus classes are cancelled.

    We encourage you to review the important information and resources available through the following links and share with others:

    Potential Exposure

    Undergraduate nursing students, in their educational experience, are most likely to encounter patients with undiagnosed COVID-19, in the emergency room. Given this potential exposure, I am requesting that no undergraduate nursing student be allowed to have an ER observation until further notice. Our graduate students, in primary care, are most likely to encounter patients with undiagnosed COVID-19, in the clinic where an undiagnosed patient simply shows up at the clinic door (even though they should call ahead). Graduate students should use basic virus control strategies including having the patient wear a mask and follow clinic guidelines. The School of Nursing does have a limited number of N95 masks and disposable gowns for graduate students. We are investigating performing fit testing for those graduate students who would like this option; but do not yet have it available. Ultimately, as directed above, ALL students (undergraduate and graduate) should not provide direct care to these patients.

    In the unlikely circumstance that a student or faculty member encounters a PUI (person under investigation) of COVID-19, the student or faculty should immediately turn the patient over to the clinic or unit staff and document their findings. You should subsequently follow the procedure outlined in the “Infection Control Recommendations for COVID-19” above, notify the EMU School of Nursing office and complete an Incident Report for the agency and the School of Nursing (the School of Nursing will notify the Dean of Students of your potential exposure).

    Precautions You Should See Used:
    • Isolation precautions for droplet and airborne are currently recommended.
    • Put a mask on the patient.
    • Place patient in single room.
    • Use a negative pressure room if available.
    • Use PPE upon entry into room (gloves, isolation gowns, N95 mask or PAPR, eye protection).
    • Limit transport and movement of patients outside of their room.
    Use basic virus control strategies:
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap/water is not available.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and discard it in the trash.
    • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
    What to do if you are sick:
    • Symptoms of COVID-19 are fever (100.5o or >), cough and/or shortness of breath.
    • Stay home and call for medical care (call your doctor’s office rather than just showing up).
    • Contact all of your instructors and the School of Nursing about your illness.
    • Do not go to work, school, or public places.
    • Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home.
    • Wear a face mask and use appropriate doffing procedures to avoid self-contamination.
    • Follow basic virus control strategies above.
    • Monitor your symptoms for progression.
    • If you must go to the doctor’s office, emergency room or call EMS, don a facemask to limit exposure to the healthcare providers.

    Class and Clinical Cancellations

    In Class cancellations: In the event classes are canceled by the university or a faculty member over COVID-19 concerns, the wonderful world of technology will allow us to put the information online for student access. Individual faculty will communicate with their classes about plans to move content, assignments, or examinations online. If a student self-reports an illness during this time, faculty are asked to be lenient with deadline dates to accommodate recovery and return to the lessons. It is not reasonable to assume the ill student will stay on time with assignments and examination when ill. Also, student self-report of illness is sufficient for “excused” absences as ill individuals are being asked not to overwhelm the health system and clinic offices are refusing to provide notes of excused absences due to increased workload. If faculty have any concerns about these practices, they should discuss these with one of us.

    Clinical cancellations: Currently, we have been in contact with our major clinical partners and they have no plans to restrict student attendance at clinical; in fact, your assistance may be particularly helpful if they have sick employees. Reminder—do not care for airborne precaution patients, but do care for other patients! We are discussing additional simulation hours for clinical make-up for undergraduate clinicals (which is acceptable from the Board of Nursing). For graduate students, who must have direct patient care hours, simulation is not an option. We are investigating “telehealth” options for direct patient care hours and we encourage graduate students to increase their hours before the outbreak gets severe. We will do everything possible to assist students in meeting their clinical objectives and required clinical hours.

    Clinical instructor illness: At this time, if a clinical instructor is ill, we will handle the cancellation as is our current practice. The clinical instructor can request a substitute instructor from Dr. Newberry or one of us if sufficient time allows, or the clinical instructor will cancel and provide an alternative assignment that students can complete in place of clinical. The clinical instructor should notify the clinical unit of their absence, the lead faculty and the SON office. If a clinical instructor becomes a person under investigating for COVID-19 and requires self-quarantine, alternative arrangements will be determined at that time.

    Also, as the outbreak unfolds, the School of Nursing is prepared to offering hand washing clinics around campus, general PPE review for all health profession students at EMU, cough etiquette, mask usage, and other education to the campus community. We are deploying rubber gloves, hand sanitizer, Kleenex tissues, and Clorox wipes to classrooms within the Marshall building and we would encourage students to disinfect their classroom tables prior to use. We are also asking that work-study students disinfect their workspaces and telephones every shift.

    Thank you to students and other that have self-reported their travel and their potential exposure concerns to us! For our fully online students, please self-report to the School of Nursing and to your preceptor where you are completing your capstone practice experience! If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to any of us within the main office and we’ll return your inquiry as soon as possible.

    Please be prepared, stay informed with accurate information, educate others and protect your patients, their families, your classmates and coworkers and yourself. Please let me know if you have questions or concerns.

  • March 2: Letter to Students

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    March 2, 2020

    Dear Students,

    Given the current spread of COVID-19, we at EMU are doing our part to help mitigate the spread of this virus. Please complete this Winter Break Travel form whether or not you traveled over break (or within the last month). The form has four questions and should take less than a couple of minutes to complete.

    Thank you for your help,

    Dr Bumpus
    Sherry Bumpus, Phd, FNP-BC
    Director of Nursing Operations

Current Updates

  • Any Student, Staff, Faculty, FTL, or PTL with COVI-19 must notify the Director of Nursing.
  • CAPS & Nursing are offering Drop-in support sessions for nursing students, graduating seniors, R2B students, and alumni. Email Nursing office for details.
  • Nursing courses may not be Pass/Fail.
  • You are expected to be available during  clinical hours if you are having online clinicals.
  • Graduate and R2B students, may continue clinicals if sites permit.
  • See bottom of page for:
    • Student resources 
    • How to talk to kids about COVID-19
    • Relevant licensing, legal, and executive orders

Information about COVID-19 for Healthcare Providers

Resources for Students

CAPS Mental HealthCare Package [PDF]

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) will continue to offer after-hours phone support (734.487.1118) after 5 p.m. and on weekends. If you have questions or need to speak with a counselor, please contact us at 734.487.1118 or by email at [email protected].

Other mental health resources include:

 How to talk to kids about COVID-19

Executive Orders and Licensing Information Relevant to Nursing