David Crary

A photo of David Crary

Associate Professor, Graduate Coordinator

Economics

703G Pray Harrold

734.487.0001

[email protected]

Office Hours

Winter 2020
T - 12:30pm-5:00pm, 5:30pm-6:15pm
R - 12:30pm-5:00pm

Education

  • Ph.D. University of Maryland

Interests and Expertise

Dr. Crary's major areas of academic interests are:

  • Macroeconomics
  • Economic forecasting
  • Monetary economics

Dr. Crary joined the department in 1980. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. For the past ten years he has served as coach for the department's student Fed Challenge competition in Chicago. For ten years (until 1994) Dr. Crary held a joint appointment with economics and EMU's Institute for Community and Regional Development, ICARD. His work with ICARD included conducting its regular forecasts of economic growth in the southeast Michigan region, pursuing special projects such as a study of the regional economic impact of the 1992 closing of the General Motors Willow Run Assembly plant, and editing its newsletter. Dr. Crary's economic forecasts for the southeast Michigan region were regularly published in conjunction with ICARD'S newsletters and special reports. Currently, he is working on re-estimating and updating the macroeconomic model of the U.S. economy used in his forecasting and monetary policy classes.

Courses

  • Undergraduate and graduate economic forecasting
  • The graduate research seminar
  • U.S. economic history
  • A monetary policy course
  • The macroeconomics half of the principles of economics sequence

Publications and Presentations

  • "Modeling Grassland Ecosystem Responses to Coupled Climate and Socioeconomic Influences from Multispacial and Temporal Scales," with Yichum Xie, et.al., Journal of Environmental Informatics, forthcoming
  • "Economic Performance of Michigan Cities and Metropolitian Areas," with George Erickceb and Allen Goodman. Ch. 11 in Michigan at the Millennium. Michigan State University Press, 2003
  • "Labor quality, Natural Unemployment, and U.S. Inflation," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, 2000