Eastern Michigan University
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Registration Today For Winter 2018 Courses!

Undergraduate Courses

WRTG 310W: Writing and Civic Literacy - CRN 26076
2:00 pm- 3:15 pm MW | PRAY-H 609 | Prof. John Dunn
How do contemporary writer/advocates use writing and rhetoric to argue for reform in vital public policy debates—from the environment to healthcare? WRTG 310 introduces students to advocacy, public argument, and social movements, so students can advocate for constructive change on public issues that matter in their lives. Students practice strategies of inquiry from defining a specific public issue, to analyzing the current state of debate, to finally taking the role of advocate by writing for public audiences.

WRTG 324W: Principles of Tech Comm - CRN 26234
11:00 am-12:15 pm TR | PRAY-H 313 | Professor Chalice Randazzo
Winter 2018 starts with writing and designing effective resumes and cover letters. Then, we’ll move into a real client-based project where students research users and create a deliverable (the client is already provided). Students gain valuable skills like audience analysis, technical and professional writing, design, and project management. 

WRTG 328W Writing, Style, and Technology - CRN 23952
11:00 am- 12:15 pm MW | PRAY-H 313 | Professor Cheryl Cassidy
What is “style” and how does it impact the rhetorical effectiveness of writing? In this advanced writing course, students study 1) Different definitions and assumptions of “style” as it relates to writing and rhetoric, and also how style has changed. 2) How styles change based on genre, purpose, and media. 3) The practices ofadvanced composition and rhetoric in considering the writing process and revision. Projects include tylistic/rhetorical analyses of a variety of different texts (print, advertisements, videos, websites, etc.), a comparison of different style guides and writing advice texts, and an analysis of revision practices. 

WRTG 328W Writing, Style, and Technology - CRN 23953
ONLINE | Professor Logan Bearden 
What is “style” and how does it impact the rhetorical effectiveness of writing? In this advanced writing course, students study 1) Different definitions and assumptions of “style” as it relates to writing and rhetoric, and also how style has changed. 2) How styles change based on genre, purpose, and media. 3) The practices of advanced composition and rhetoric in considering the writing process and revision.: Projects include stylistic/rhetorical analyses of a variety of different texts (print, advertisements, videos, websites, etc.), a “remix” of an existing style rule, a radical revision of previous work, and a digital portfolio.

WRTG 417 Rhetoric and the Written Word - CRN 23114
5:00 pm-6:15 pm MW | PRAY-H 609 | Professor John Dunn
What role does rhetorical theory play in writing and learning? Students are introduced to work on rhetoric and writing from classical rhetoric to contemporary composition studies, and then apply these concepts to a writing project of their own choosing, and examine how the theories studied define what it means to be a writer as well as what is at stake when we write.

WRTG 428: Writing Documentation, Usability, and User Experience - CRN 23960/ CRN 24795
3:30 pm-4:45 pm TR | PRAY-H 313 | Professor Chalice Randazzo
Winter 2018 focuses on a real client-based project. Students write and run usability tests to create written instructions and screen-capture video tutorials (students do not need to know screen-capture software before entering the course). The projects can become portfolio pieces that highlight skills in audience analysis, design, usability research, screen-capture video editing, and project management.

WRTG 444: Writing for the World Wide Web - CRN 26233/ CRN 26966
ONLINE|Professor Steven Krause
What are the contemporary practices for creating content available on the web and mobile devices? This course teaches students 1) an introduction to HTML, CSS, and related coding/simple programming 2) the evolving role of social media and user-generated media 3) best practices for managing and publishing web-based content. Projects in Winter 2018 will include exercises in HTML, CSS, and other coding/scripting tools for publishing content on the web and for mobile devices; an introduction to content management software (such as WordPress); studying and  redesigning an existing web site; and research and ethnographic study of the role of social media–particularly Facebook and Twitter–in current events and the spread of “Fake News.”

WRTG 484W Seminar in Written Communication -CRN 23115
5:00 pm-6:15 pm TR | PRAY-H 314 | Professor Steve Benninghoff
How do WRCM graduates adapt and apply their learning from EMU courses (& work experience) to different jobs and careers? In 484 students learn about school-to-work transitions, and alumni and professionals visit the class and explain their varied work. Students re-examine their coursework, tailor their experience in portfolios framed for their job hunt. These are reviewed by professionals who give students feedback on the materials and career advice. Students also do one consulting project, developing informational documents for a client.

Graduate Courses

WRTG 514 Issues in Teaching Writing | CRN 23796
6:30 pm 09:10 pm Thursday | PRAY-H 608 | Professor Logan Bearden
This course is designed to introduce the major theoretical underpinnings accompanying pedagogical practices as well as historical paradigm shifts and contemporary issues that inform those theories. Together, we will consider what our students write, why they write, and how they write in addition to what we can do to help them become better writers. Students will develop teaching materials that are informed by disciplinary knowledge and best practices. Projects include a teaching portfolio, reflections on readings, and blogging.

WRTG 518 Rhetoric and the Written Word | CRN 25661
5:00 pm-6:15 pm MW | PRAY-H 609 | Professor John Dunn
What role can rhetorical theory play in the practice of writing and the process of learning? Graduate students in WRTG518 survey a range of answers drawn from scholarship in the classical traditions of rhetoric as well as the contemporary discipline of composition studies then apply each to their own writing projects and reflect on the implications different assumptions (theories) can hold for the experiences of writing, teaching, and the study of writing. Scholarly perspectives featured in WRTG518 include those of Aristotle, Anis Bawarshi, James Berlin, Wendy Bishop, Lloyd Bitzer, William Coles, Robert Connors, Edward Corbett, Jenny Edbauer, Peter Elbow, Linda Flower, James Gee, Walker Gibson, Keith Gilyard, Maxine Hairston, Donald Lazere, Andrea Lunsford, Donald Murray, Gary Olson, Quintilian, Patricia Roberts Miller, William Stafford, Sondra Perl, and Richard Young, among others.

WRTG 523:Writing Documentation, Usability, and User Experience |CRN 23960/CRN 24795
3:30 pm-4:45 pm TR | PRAY-H 313 | Professor Chalice Randazzo
Winter 2018 focuses on a real client-based project. Students write and run usability tests to create written instructions and screen-capture video tutorials (students do not need to know screen-capture software before entering the course). The projects can become portfolio pieces that highlight skills in audience analysis, design, usability research, screen-capture video editing, and project management.

WRTG 524 Advanced Technical Writing and Research | CRN 23954
6:30 pm 09:10 pm Tuesday | PRAY-H 313 | Professor Steve Benninghoff
How do we know whether “documents”—texts, websites, social media, visuals—“succeed” in the multiple kinds of communication work they are designed for? WRTG 524 surveys multiple perspectives on tech comm research usability, user experience, interaction design, information design, ethnography, and others—that give students multiple ways to research, design, and assess workplace communication of many kinds. In W18, WRTG 524 will include a client usability research project, where students will get hands-on experience designing and implementing usability tests and transforming their results into effective reports for clients.

WRTG 544:Writing for the World Wide Web | CRN 26966 
ONLINE| Professor Steven Krause
What are the contemporary practices for creating content available on the web and mobile devices? This course teaches students 1) an introduction to HTML, CSS, and related coding/simple programming 2) the evolving role of social media and user- generated media 3) best practices for managing and publishing web-based content. Projects in Winter 2018 will include exercises in HTML, CSS, and other coding/scripting tools for publishing content
on the web and for mobile devices; an introduction to content management software (such as WordPress); studying and redesigning an existing web site; and research and ethnographic study of the role of social media-- particularly Facebook and Twitter-- in current events and the spread of “Fake News.”

WRTG 621 Research in Theory and Practice of Writing | CRN 23795
6:30 pm-9:10 pm Wednesday |Professor Steven Krause
The catalog describes WRTG 621 as “A course designed to prepare students in methods of research on writing, pedagogy, professional writing and written discourse.” To accomplish this, you will work individually on preparing a proposal for a writing project (aka WRTG 692/693/694) and we will study together qualitative, quantitative, and
theoretical research methodologies at the heart of scholarly work in writing studies.