ChatGPT Programming

Description

ChatGPT Image

For the fall 2023 semester, WAC and the FDC will offer an opportunity through convening a small group of us to have conversations about generative AI, particularly in relation to teaching and assigning writing. This would be a think tank of sorts -- and opportunity for those of us interested in the topic to come together, read and discuss some things, etc. The first of these discussions will take place on Tuesday, September 19th.

Please use the form below to express interest in participating. The schedule for this group will be determined as we move into the fall semester.

If you have any questions, please reach out to Ann ([email protected]) or to Jeff ([email protected]). We hope you'll join us for one of these opportunities this fall!

Register Here


  • ChatGPT: New Semester, New Challenges Expand dropdown

    Our world of higher education was recently rocked by the emergence of ChatGPT, an AI chatbot capable of producing serviceable and, in some cases, quite good papers in response to prompts. This raises questions about the implications this technology may have on how we teach and assign writing. If students are able to take our paper prompts, feed them into this software, and get papers indistinguishable from actual student work, this clearly presents us with challenges and calls for us to rethink elements of how we teach, and how we design our assignments.

    Ann Blakeslee and Beth Sabo from the Writing Across the Curriculum program and the University Writing Center and Jeff Bernstein from the Faculty Development Center hosted two ChatGPT sessions during the summer of 2023. These sessions took place before the fall 2023 semester begins and offered instructors resources to take with them into the start of the year, including syllabus statements, classroom policies, and assignments. 

    View the PowerPoint from these sessions.

  • ChatGPT: The Hype and The Reality Expand dropdown

    Our world of higher education was recently impacted by the emergence of ChatGPT, an AI chatbot capable of producing serviceable and, in some cases, quite good papers in response to prompts.  For example, if, as the FDC Director did, one were to type into ChatGPT "Write a love letter to my wife, Lisa," ChatGPT can produce a very serviceable love letter that almost fooled the aforementioned Lisa.  (Note: this was done for experimental purposes. Trying this at home may have unintended consequences!)

    On a more serious note, though, this raises questions about the implications this technology may have on how we teach and assign writing.  If students are able to take our paper prompts, feed them into this software, and get papers indistinguishable from actual student work, this clearly presents us with challenges and may call for us to rethink elements of how we teach.

    Read the blog post from Michael McVey about ChatGPT.

    Much discussion has ensued about ChatGPT as evidenced by a recent New York Times story, and many other stories about this in Inside Higher Ed, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and other such publications, including the blog post linked above.  But how much does or will this change our teaching landscape?  How should we approach and think about the assignments we give?  Put another way, to what extent do the good teaching practices we've all strived to put into effect address the capabilities of and challenges ChatGPT presents? 

    Ann Blakeslee from the Writing Across the Curriculum program and the Writing Center and Jeff Bernstein from the Faculty Development Center hosted an informal discussion on Monday, January 30, 2023, about what ChatGPT is, what it does, and how it can, might, and should affect our teaching practices–and our thinking about teaching. Please join Ann and Jeff as they continue the conversation with another ChatGPT event, "More Good Chat about ChatGPT."


    More Good Chat About ChatGPT

    ChatGPT continues to attract a great deal of attention in the world of higher education. Ann Blakeslee and Jeff Bernstein in this conversation, discussed how we can use ChatGPT in our classes and how it can lead us to revisit principles of good practice in creating assignments for our students. Ann and Jeff helped frame the issues, and heard from all of YOU on how we can all adapt pedagogically to this new development.