Developing High Quality Lesson Plans Using Historical Resources

Lesson Plans

 

Who Am I | Freedom & Slavery

 

Looking at Freedom and Slavery from Differing Lenses


Subject

American History

Topic

What it means to be a slave versus a free person

Grade

Middle School - Grades 7 & 8

Objectives

Given class discussion and research using the Internet and books in the classroom, students will

  • learn about the Declaration of Independence, the Three-Fifths Compromise and the Constitution as well as their relationship to freedom for all mankind
  • be able to articulate what it means to be a slave vs being a free person
  • use Glogster.com to create an interactive poster about slavery and freedom

Michigan Dept of Education - Technology Standards

6-8.CI. Creativity and Innovation—By the end of grade 8 each student will:

6-8.CI.2. create an original project (e.g., presentation, web page, newsletter, information brochure) using a variety of media (e.g., animations, graphs, charts, audio, graphics, video) to present content information to an audience


6-8.RI. Research and Information Literacy—By the end of grade 8 each student will:

6-8.RI.1. use a variety of digital resources to locate information

6-8.RI.2. evaluate information from online information resources for accuracy and bias

6-8.RI.3. understand that using information from a single Internet source might result in the reporting of erroneous facts and that multiple sources should always be researched


6-8.DC. Digital Citizenship—By the end of grade 8 each student will:

6-8.DC.1. provide accurate citations when referencing information sources

(source: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/METS_6-8_129586_7.pdf)

Michigan Dept of Education - Social Studies Content Expectations

U3.3 Creating New Government(s) and a New Constitution
Explain the challenges faced by the new nation and analyze the development of the Constitution as a new plan for governing. [Foundations for Civics HSCE Standard 2.2.]
8 – U3.3.3 Describe the major issues debated at the Constitutional Convention including the distribution of political power, conduct of foreign affairs, rights of individuals, rights of states, election of the executive, and slavery as a regional and federal issue.
8 – U3.3.6 Explain how the Bill of Rights reflected the concept of limited government, protections of basic freedoms, and the fear of many Americans of a strong central government. (C3)
8 – U3.3.7 Using important documents (e.g., Mayflower Compact, Iroquois Confederacy, Common Sense, Declaration of Independence, Northwest Ordinance, Federalist Papers), describe the historical and philosophical origins of constitutional government in the United States using the ideas of social compact, limited government, natural rights, right of revolution, separation of powers,
bicameralism, republicanism, and popular participation in government. (C2)

Materials

  • Internet access

  • Primary sources

  • Glogster.com class account (opens in a new window)

Class Duration

2-3 days

Activities

The teacher will discuss with the students the Charters of Freedom and who and what they designated to be free in the United States. They will  reflect about what it means to be free as written by government documents, court cases, within freedom songs, from the thoughts of their peers around the U.S., etc.

 

Resources

The students will create a glogster poster which reflects their thinking about what it means to be free versus a slave.

Students will get into a basic restorative circle and share their reflections about freedom and slavery including a time when they did not feel free.

Assessment

  • The glogster poster must include text, video and or audio, images.
  • The text must include at least 2 facts from the Charters of Freedom or the Three Fifths Compromise as it relates to being free.
  • All facts must be accurate.
  • The glogster posters will be shared with the entire class. 

 

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Who Am I? People of the Underground Railroad

 

 

 

Subject

American History

Topic

People on the journey to freedom

Grade

Middle School

Objectives

Given class discussion and research using the Internet and books in the classroom, students will

  • learn about historical figures and describe the contributions and impact of people supporting the enslaved African's journey to freedom
  • use Voki.com to create a talking avatar speaking about one of the enslaved Africans or someone who helped them flee to freedom 

Michigan Dept of Education - Technology Standards

6-8.CI. Creativity and Innovation—By the end of grade 8 each student will:

 

6-8.CI.2. create an original project (e.g., presentation, web page, newsletter, information brochure) using a variety of media (e.g., animations, graphs, charts, audio, graphics, video) to present content information to an audience


6-8.RI. Research and Information Literacy—By the end of grade 8 each student will:

 

6-8.RI.1. use a variety of digital resources to locate information

 

6-8.RI.2. evaluate information from online information resources for accuracy and bias

 

6-8.RI.3. understand that using information from a single Internet source might result in the reporting of erroneous facts and that multiple sources should always be researched


6-8.DC. Digital Citizenship—By the end of grade 8 each student will:

 

6-8.DC.1. provide accurate citations when referencing information sources

 

(source: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/METS_6-8_129586_7.pdf)

Michigan Dept of Education - Social Studies Content Expectations

U2.2 European Slave Trade and Slavery in Colonial America

 

  • Analyze the development of the slave system in the Americas and its impact upon the life of Africans.

 

  • 5 – U2.2.2 Describe the life of enslaved Africans and free Africans in the American colonies. (National Geography Standard 5, p. 152)


U4.3 Reform Movements

 

  • Analyze the growth of antebellum American reform movements.
  • 8 – U4.3.2 Describe the formation and development of the abolitionist movement by considering the roles of key abolitionist leaders (e.g., John Brown and the armed resistance, Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, Sojourner Truth, William Lloyd Garrison, and Frederick Douglass), and the response of southerners and northerners to the abolitionist movement. (C2) (National Geography Standard 6, p. 154)

Materials

  • Internet access

  • Primary sources

  • Voki.com account

Class Duration

2-3 days

Activities

The teacher will talk with the students about people who fled enslavement or who supported the enslaved Africans on their journey to freedom. e.g., enslaved Africans who made it to freedom such as Anthony Chase, conductors such as Harriet Tubman, friends such as the Quakers Benjamin Lay and Anthony Benzet, abolitionist such as Frederick Douglas, etc. 

Resources: 

 

 

The teacher asks the students to choose either a person who fled enslavement or a person who helped the enslaved Africans. (The teacher will record the selections.)

 

Students will then use the Internet and textbooks to research the contributions of the person who helped the enslaved Africans.

 

After completing their research, students will word process a script and create a talking avatar based on the script.

 

When the talking avatar is done, students will email the script and the Voki link to the teacher and him or herself.

 

The class will listen to the talking avatars.

Assessment

  • Each talking avatar must share 5-10 facts about their person (e.g., name, year of birth, what they did, how it impacted their or someone else's freedom, etc.)
  • All facts must be accurate.
  • The talking avatar must cite sources at the end of the narrative.

 

(Source: Toni Stokes Jones, Ph.D.)

 

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