Huron logo to be removed from EMU Marching Band jackets

To the Eastern Michigan University community:

This morning I notified members of the Native American Student Organization (NASO) and their faculty advisor, Dr. Lori Burlingame, that I am initiating a process to remove the Huron logo from the jackets of the EMU Marching Band. The university will be purchasing new uniform jackets with no logos nor symbols other than the block “E,” which will continue to be on the outside of the jacket.

This action will happen as expeditiously as possible and the associated costs will be paid for out of donated funds from the EMU Foundation -- there will be no impact on the General Fund and no student tuition dollars will be utilized.

This action results from a thorough review, by myself and members of EMU’s senior leadership team, of the 1991 decision by the Board of Regents to stop using the Huron logo and name.

Unanimously approved by Board of Regents in 1991, this board action made clear there would be no further use of the Huron logo or name by the university. The resolution stated: “Having given this issue thorough consideration, (we) recommend Eastern change the Huron logo and name to symbols more compatible with our own institutional values and goals, now and in the future. Symbols promote and perpetuate values, defining those of us who use them, creating their future as well as reflecting their past. As an educational institution, Eastern Michigan University cannot justify the continued use of symbols which we now know offend and denigrate, however unintentionally, members of our community.”

You can click on this link to read the official minutes of the January 30, 1991 Board of Regents meeting.

As we all know, controversy and questions surrounding the use of logos and symbols that are offensive to some groups or community members is a highly complex issue that is not isolated to Eastern Michigan University. I encourage you to read the full text of the Board minutes from the 1991 meeting. The recommendation provides a thoughtful analysis of the issues at hand, and is as relevant today as when first decided over 20 years ago.

I want to thank the members of NASO, Dr. Burlingame, and other faculty and staff who assisted in the research of this matter and its resolution.

I know you all join me in celebrating Eastern Michigan University’s accomplishments and working together towards its remarkable future.

Sincerely,

Kim Schatzel