Sustainability Framework

For its sustainability framework, EMU has chosen a system developed by the nationally recognized leader in sustainability in higher education, the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). AASHE developed, over the last couple of decades, the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS) system, which is a sustainability crediting system used by over 800 institutions on six continents to calculate their sustainability rating.

Full criteria, credit rationale, applicability to the institution, scoring, reporting fields, measurement, term definitions and examples of the STARS system are provided in the full STARS technical manual v 2.1 found at: STARS Manuals and Tools. Below is a short summary of each of the STARS criteria that can be used to gain points in the rating system. The total STARS rating score determines one of four STARS ratings available: Bronze (25 or above), Silver (45 or above), Gold (65 or above) and Platinum (85 or above). Each rating level represents a significant and widely recognized increase in an institution’s commitment to sustainability.

STARS category: Academics (40 points available)

  • AC 1: Academic Courses (14 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has conducted an inventory during the previous three years to identify its sustainability course offerings for current and prospective students, both as a percentage of all courses and all departments offering sustainability courses.

    The following courses are sustainability-focused or have sustainability as a learning outcome and are regularly offered by the university:

  • AC 2: Learning Outcomes (8 points available)

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    Criteria Description: Institution’s students graduate from degree programs that include sustainability as a learning outcome, or include multiple sustainability learning outcomes based on the percentage of graduates from such programs.

    The Environmental Science and Society (ENVI) interdisciplinary major has the following Student Learning Outcomes:

    1. Develop critical thinking skills and apply them to the analysis of a problem or question.

    2. Demonstrate an understanding of major environmental issues and their potential solutions.

    3. Demonstrate understanding of the scientific process, including inquiry, hypotheses, and revision.

    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of diverse worldviews in public and scholarly discourses on environmental issues.

    5. Demonstrate an understanding of concepts, principles, and theoretical frameworks for analyzing the ethical aspects of environmental issues.

    6. Demonstrate the ability to identify the formal and informal societal constraints on addressing environmental problems.

    7. Communicate integrated perspectives on complex environmental problems or issues to both professional and lay audiences.

    8. Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of at least one of the sub-disciplines within the ENVI major.

  • AC3: Undergraduate Program (3 points available)

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    Criteria Description: Institutions have at least one sustainability-focused degree program, or the equivalent for undergraduate students. Partial credit would be granted for sustainability-focused minor, concentration or certificate.

    The following undergraduate programs are sustainability-focused or have sustainability as a learning outcome:

    Environmental Science and Society (ENVI), Interdisciplinary major: Students develop an understanding of major environmental issues and their potential solutions by appreciating the importance of scientific methods, ethical values and principles, diverse worldviews, and social and political constraints, which are relevant to addressing these issues. Students learn about the complex connections between natural and built environments, and between these environments and our social and cultural institutions.

    Construction Management (CM) major: The Construction Management (CM) program focuses on teaching the technical and business skills required to prepare men and women for middle- and upper-level management in the construction industry. Coursework is structured to teach students problem-solving skills needed through hands-on learning. Emphases are placed on construction cost estimating, scheduling, contracts, construction law, project management, surveying, sustainability, material testing and safety management. All students are required to complete a co-op work placement course.

    Sustainability minor: Provides students with a broad-based and interdisciplinary introduction to the growing field of sustainability. It explores the diverse origins and philosophies of sustainability studies while simultaneously providing hands-on exposure to the application of the field's "triple bottom-line" valuation system which takes into account environmental, economic, and social equity factors when measuring a project's potential success and/or failure.

  • AC4: Graduate Program (3 points available)

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    Criteria Description: Institutions have at least one sustainability-focused degree program, or the equivalent for graduate students. Partial credit would be granted for sustainability-focused minor, concentration or certificate.

    The following graduate programs are sustainability-focused or have sustainability as a learning outcome:

    Master of Arts in Social Foundations and Community Education (Ecojustice and Education Concentration): is an interdisciplinary graduate program. A primary interest of social foundations of education is to affirm the importance of social and ecological justice, democracy, and equity as these affect and are affected by the social, cultural, historical, and political contexts of schooling.

    Sustainable Construction Graduate Certificate: Assists those with an undergraduate degree in a construction related area to update their skills in the emerging, critical area of sustainability in construction and design. The program provides the adult learner with the knowledge base for understanding the management processes of the construction industry related to sustainability, including the initiating, planning, execution, control and close-out of "green" construction projects

  • AC5: Immersive Experience (2 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution offers at least one immersive, sustainability-focused educational study program. The program is one week or more in length and may take place off-campus, overseas or on-campus.
  • AC6: Sustainability Literacy Assessment (4 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution conducts an assessment of the sustainability literacy of its students. The sustainability literacy assessment focuses on knowledge of sustainability topics and challenges.

    EMU has not performed a Sustainability Literacy Assessment.

  • AC7: Incentives for Developing Courses (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has an ongoing program or programs that offer incentives for faculty in multiple disciplines or departments to develop new sustainability courses and/or incorporate sustainability into existing courses or departments. 

    EMU does not have incentives specifically for developing Sustainability courses.

  • AC8: Campus as a Living Laboratory (4 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution is utilizing its infrastructure and operations for multidisciplinary student learning and applied research that contributes to understanding campus sustainability challenges or advancing sustainability on campus.
  • AC9: Research and Scholarship (12 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution has conducted an inventory during the previous three years to identify its sustainability research activities and initiatives and makes the inventory publicly available. Activities are measured as a percentage of all faculty, staff, and departments engaged in sustainability research.
  • AC10: Support for Research (4 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution encourages and/or supports sustainability research through encouraging students and/or faculty in multiple disciplines or academic programs to conduct research in sustainability, written policies and procedures that give positive recognition to interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, and multidisciplinary research during faculty promotion and/or tenure decisions, and library support for sustainability research and learning.

    EMU does not have a support mechanism in place specifically for sustainability research

  • AC11: Open Access to Research (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has a published open access policy that ensures that versions of future scholarly articles by faculty and staff are deposited in a designated open access repository.

    EMU does not have a published open access policy.

STARS category: Engagement (21 points available)

  • EN 1: Student Educators Program (4 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution coordinates an ongoing peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program for students enrolled for credit.

    EMU does not have a student sustainability educators program.

  • EN 2: Student Orientation (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution includes sustainability prominently in its student orientation activities and programming.

    EMU does not include sustainability in student orientation.

  • EN 3: Student Life (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has co-curricular sustainability programs and initiatives such as: student groups; gardens, farms, community supported agriculture, and urban agriculture projects; student-run enterprises that include sustainability as part of their mission statement; conferences, speaker series, symposia; cultural art events, installations, or performances; wilderness or outdoor programs; sustainability-themed semesters, or first-year experiences; programs to learn sustainable life skills; sustainability-focused student employment; and/or graduation pledges.

    EMU has the following student groups that have co-curricular sustainability programs and initiatives:

    GREEN: Gathering Resources to Educate about our Environment and Nature (GREEN) is a student organization working to provide educational, interactive, and
    environmentally-beneficial opportunities for Eastern Michigan University and
    the surrounding community. They run and are involved in a variety of events
    throughout the year including GREEN Week, Greening of Detroit, Hazardous
    Waste Drop-off and much more. Also, home of the Giving Garden, a student ran
    garden on campus where students grow food for themselves or to donate, get
    involved this summer!

    GeoClub: The Geo Club at EMU is a group dedicated to learning, discussing, observing, and having fun with Earth Science, Geography, and Geology. We have regular meetings to discuss up-coming events and topics. Events include fundraisers, field trips, mixers, scientific lectures, movie nights, and much more! Topics are limitless! How to become a member: First, Geo Club welcomes any and all students of ANY major, not just Geology and Earth Science majors.

    Net Impact: Net Impact empowers a new generation to drive social and environmental change throughout their careers. EMU's volunteer-led chapter drives change by creating a like-minded community and providing events and programs that support members who aim to use business as a force for environmental and social impact.

    VegPlanet: This is a plant-based diet student group, educating and raising awareness of the environmental impacts of animal agriculture, in addition to health and ethical viewpoints. Weekly meetings take place at 6 p.m. in Pray Harrold, spanning topics of climate change, pollution, antibiotic resistance, environmental justice and more! We also participate in recipe exchanges, documentary nights, and restaurant outings!

    Students for EcoJustice Education and Activism: The purpose of this nonprofit organization is to bring together students who are passionate about analyzing deep cultural roots of ecological and social crises and work towards reclaiming our cultural and ecological commons. In order to revitalize our commons, which have been devalued by industrialization, they create a space to address these issues using art, activism, discussion, action and education for the holistic sustainability.

    EMU has the following garden where students can learn about sustainable food systems

    The Giving Garden is an area on campus where students, staff, faculty and
    Ypsilanti residents to rent plots and garden. Their mission is to empower
    individuals through gardening and upholding five guiding principles:
    sustainability, organic agriculture, community and place, education, and
    respect. The garden donates portions of their food to Swoops food pantry and is
    actively involved in the community. They partner with the GREEN student
    organization and are part of the vision volunteer center.

    EMU has the following student-run sustainability enterprise

    Swoops: Swoop's Student Food Pantry is a campus-based organization that is run by a leadership board consisting of EMU faculty, staff, students and alumni volunteers. Haley Moraniec, a social work alum, recognized the need on campus and took the initiative to research both the issues and what other universities had accomplished. She then wrote a proposal and developed the food pantry. Its mission is to provide EMU students in need with food assistance and additional resources to positively affect well-being and college success. Its goals are to:

    a) Create a sustainable resource for students to temporarily help meet food needs of students on campus.

    b) To meet emergency, non-food needs of students.
    Distribute food discreetly in easily accessible and safe environments on-campus.
    To provide students with resources to assist them in accessing services in the area.

    c) To involve community partners to assure the sustainability of the pantry.

    EMU has events related to sustainability that have students as the intended audience

    The Environmental Science and Society organization provides ample opportunities for students to attend and participate with these events. Eastern Michigan University also provides an opportunity for undergraduate students to present research at the Undergraduate Research Symposium. Many of the students that participate present on relevant sustainability and environmental issues.

    EMU has programs through which students can learn sustainable life skills

    It is important for students to be involved at the university and/or professional field. Eastern Michigan University requires Learning Beyond the Classroom (LBC) Credit as part of the Gen Ed. program, which can be fulfilled in many different ways. It is important to be active because a university education is about more than just classes. Students involved in activities outside of the classroom have higher retention rates and more positive educational experiences. Learning Beyond the Classroom encourages you to: obtain hands-on experience, gain important skills for future professions, and bridges classroom knowledge with out-of-classroom experiences.

  • EN 4: Outreach Materials and Publications (2 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution produces outreach materials and/or publications that foster sustainability learning and knowledge.
  • EN 5: Outreach Campaign (4 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution holds at least one sustainability-related outreach campaign directed at students and/or employees that yields measurable, positive results in advancing sustainability.
  • EN 6: Assessing Sustainability Culture (1 point available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution conducts an assessment of campus sustainability culture.

    EMU has not conducted an assessment on campus sustainability culture.

  • EN 7: Employee Educators Program (3 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution administers or oversees an ongoing staff/faculty peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program.
  • EN 8: Employee Orientation (1 point available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution covers sustainability topics in new employee orientation and/or in outreach and guidance materials distributed to new employees, including faculty and staff.
  • EN 9: Staff Professional Development (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution makes available professional development and training opportunities in sustainability to all staff at least once per year.

    EMU does not have staff professional development and training opportunities in sustainability.

  • EN 10: Community Partnerships (3 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution has one or more formal community partnership(s) with school districts, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, NGOs, businesses and/or other external entities, to work together to advance sustainability.
  • EN 11: Inter-Campus Collaboration (3 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution collaborates with other colleges and universities in one or more of the following ways to support and help build the campus sustainability community.
  • EN 12: Continuing Education (5 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution has conducted an inventory during the previous three years to identify its continuing education courses that address sustainability.
  • EN 13: Community Service (5 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution engages its student body in community service, as measured by the percentage of students who participate in community service and the average hours contributed.
  • EN 14: Participation in Public Policy (2 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution advocates for public policies that support campus sustainability or that otherwise advance sustainability.
  • EN 15: Trademark Licensing (2 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution is a member of the Fair Labor Association (FLA) and/or the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC).

STARS category: Operations (69–72 points available)

  • OP 1: Greenhouse Gas Emissions (10 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Three criteria:

    • Part 1: Institution has conducted a publicly available greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory that includes, at minimum, Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions and may also include Scope 3 GHG emissions;
    • Part 2: Institution reduced its adjusted net Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions per weighted campus user compared to a baseline;
    • Part 3: Institution’s annual adjusted net Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions are less than the minimum performance threshold of 0.02 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e) per gross square foot (0.215 MtCO2e per gross square meter) of floor area.
  • OP 2: Outdoor Air Quality (1 point available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Two criteria:

    • Part 1: Institution has written policies or guidelines to improve outdoor air quality and minimize air pollutant emissions from mobile sources on campus.
    • Part 2: Institution has completed an inventory of significant air emissions from stationary sources on campus or else verified that no such emissions are produced. 
  • OP 3: Buildings Operations and Maintenance (5 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution owns and operates buildings that are certified under a green building rating system focused on the operations and maintenance of existing buildings, e.g., LEED®: Building Operations + Maintenance (O+M), and/or operated and maintained in accordance with published sustainable operations and maintenance guidelines and policies.
  • OP 4: Building Design and Construction (3 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution-owned buildings that were constructed or underwent major renovations in the previous five years are certified under a green building rating system for new construction and major renovations, e.g., LEED®: Building Design and Construction (BD+C), certified Living under the Living Building Challenge, and/or designed and built in accordance with published green building codes, guidelines and/or policies.
  • OP 5: Building Energy Consumption (6 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution has reduced its total building energy consumption per gross square foot/meter of floor area compared to a baseline or the institution’s annual building energy consumption is less than the minimum performance threshold of 65 Btu per gross square foot per Fahrenheit degree day.
  • OP 6: Clean and Renewable Energy (4 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution supports the development and use of clean and renewable energy sources.
  • OP 7: Food and Beverage Purchasing (6 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution and/or its primary dining services contractor conducts an inventory to identify food and beverage purchases that are third party verified, and/or local and community based.
  • OP 8: Sustainable Dining (2 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution’s dining services support sustainable food systems and/or minimizes food and dining waste.
  • OP 9: Landscape Management (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution’s grounds include areas that are managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program; and/or an organic land care standard or landscape management program that has eliminated the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides in favor of ecologically preferable materials.

    EMU manages 359 of its 800 acre campus using conventional landscape management practices (which may include some IPM principles or techniques). This excludes the following areas: 47 acres of roads and sidewalks, 33 acres of building footprints, 48 acres of parking lots and a small wetland area on the western side of campus, which is not managed. EMU also composts on-site wastes, using yard wastes primarily and un-useable fruit and vegetable waste from the Universities' Student Food Pantry on rare occasion. EMU does not have a specific Integrated Pest Management (IPM) plan nor does it have an organic land care standard or sustainable landscape management program.

  • OP 10: Biodiversity (1–2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: The institution conducts an assessment to identify endangered and vulnerable species or environmentally sensitive areas on institution-owned or –managed land. The institution has plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect the species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas identified. 

    Eastern Michigan University manages Fish Lake Environmental Education Center, which includes 240 acres of woodland and wetland. Fish Lake is an area of conservation importance due to the presence of three threatened vascular plant species, Lycopus virginicus, Polemonium reptans, Potentilla canadensis; and one endangered vascular plant specie, Populus heterophylla. Further, the area has higher recorded rates of vascular plant biodiversity than the adjacent Lapeer State Game Area, as documented in a study conducted by Dr. Bunker and Dr. Hanes of the Eastern Michigan University Biology Department. A more thorough description is available from the Sustainability Commission.

     EMU has not conducted an assessment or assessments to identify environmentally sensitive areas or to identify endangered and vulnerable species (including migratory species) with habitats on institution-owned or –managed land.

  • OP 11: Sustainable Procurement (3 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Three criteria:

    • Part 1: Institution has written policies, guidelines or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across commodity categories institution-wide.
    • Part 2: Institution employs Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) as a matter of policy and practice when evaluating energy- and water-using products, system and building components.
    • Part 3: Institution has published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating products and services in one or more of the following categories: chemical intensive products and services, construction and renovation, IT, Food services, garments and linens, professional services, transportation and fuels, wood and paper, etc.
  • OP 12: Electronics Purchasing (1 point available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution purchases EPEAT registered products for desktop and notebook/laptop computers, displays, thin clients, tablets/slates, televisions and imaging equipment (copiers, digital duplicators, facsimile machines, mailing machines, multifunction devices, printers and scanners). 
  • OP 13: Cleaning and Janitorial Purchasing (1 point available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution’s main cleaning or housekeeping department(s) and/or contractor(s) purchase cleaning and janitorial paper products that meet one or more of the following criteria:
    • Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified
    • Green Seal certified
    • UL ECOLOGO certified
    • U.S. EPA Safer Choice labeled (formerly Design for the Environment)
    • Local equivalents for institutions outside the U.S. and Canada
  • OP 14: Office Paper Purchasing (1 point available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution purchases office paper with post-consumer recycled, agricultural residue, and/or Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified content.
  • OP 15: Campus Fleet (1 point available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution supports alternative fuel and power technology by including in its motorized vehicle fleet vehicles that are: gasoline-electric hybrid, diesel-electric hybrid, plug-in hybrid, 100 percent electric (including electric assist utility bicycles and tricycles), fueled with Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), hydrogen fueled, fueled with B20 or higher biofuel for more than four months of the year, and/or fueled with locally produced, low-level (e.g., B5) biofuel for more than four months of the year (e.g., fuel contains cooking oil recovered and recycled on campus or in the local community)
  • OP 16: Student Commute Modal Split (2 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution's students commute to and from campus using more sustainable commuting options such as: walking, bicycling, vanpooling or carpooling, taking public transportation, riding motorcycles or scooters, riding a campus shuttle, or a combination of these options.
  • OP 17: Employee Commute Modal Split (2 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution's employees (faculty, staff, and administrators) get to and from campus using more sustainable commuting options listed in OP 16.
  • OP 18: Support for Sustainable Transportation (2 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution has implemented one or more strategies to encourage more sustainable modes of transportation and reduce the impact of student and employee commuting.
  • OP 19: Waste Minimization and Diversion (8 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Three criteria:

    • Part 1: Institution has implemented source reduction strategies to reduce the total amount of waste generated (materials diverted + materials disposed) per weighted campus user compared to a baseline.
    • Part 2: Institution’s total annual waste generation (materials diverted and disposed) is less than the minimum performance threshold of 0.50 tons (0.45 tonnes) per weighted campus user.
    • Part 3: Institution diverts materials from the landfill or incinerator by recycling, composting, donating or re-selling.
  • OP 20: Construction and Demolition Waste Diversion (1 point available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution diverts non-hazardous construction and demolition waste from the landfill and/or incinerator.
  • OP 21: Hazardous Waste Management (1 point available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution has strategies in place to safely dispose of all hazardous, special (e.g., coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste and seeks to minimize the presence of these materials on campus.
  • OP 22: Water Use (4–6 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Three criteria:

    • Part 1: Institution has reduced its potable water use per weighted campus user compared to a baseline.
    • Part 2: Institution has reduced its potable water use per gross square foot/meter of floor area compared to a baseline.
    • Part 3: Institution has reduced its total water use (potable + non-potable) per acre/hectare of vegetated grounds compared to a baseline.
  • OP 23: Rainwater Management (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Criteria: Institution uses green infrastructure and low impact development (LID) practices to help mitigate stormwater run-off impacts and treat rainwater as a resource rather than as a waste product.

    Eastern Michigan University manages stormwater (rainwater) using several techniques. EMU incorporates retention ponds in five different locations, bioswales in 4, a rain garden at Westview apartments, a green roof at MJSC, and a rain barrel at The Giving Garden. These implementations, which are types of "Green Infrastructure”, collectively reduce the amount and slow the rate of stormwater flow from campus to the Huron River. In addition, these practices improve the quality of EMU stormwater entering the Huron River by mimicking natural filtration processes. 

    Locations of retention ponds: Green Lot 1, east of the parking lot across from EMU’s St. Joe's Sports Dome (indoor practice facility), East and South of the Student Center, and south of the Rec-IM Softball complex
     
    Locations of bioswales: Bowen Parking, Mark Jefferson Science Complex, in two separate locations at Green Lot 2 and off west Circle Drive in front of Strong Hall

STARS category: Planning and Administration (32 points available)

  • PA 1: Sustainability Coordination (1 point available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has at least one sustainability committee, office, and/or officer tasked by the administration or governing body to advise on and implement policies and programs related to sustainability on campus. 

    The President's Sustainability Commission has adopted the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS) as the framework for fostering sustainability at the university and measure, document and publicly communicate the university’s progress toward achieving each of the framework’s criteria. The Commission will develop a sustainability plan guided by this framework and our definition of sustainability to strategically plan and implement measures through policy recommendations directly to the president for continuous improvement of our campus sustainability and to our STARS rating.

    Current members of the commission (2018-2019 academic year)

    Thomas Kovacs: Chair of the Commission, Academic (Faculty)
    Sarah Fisher: Academic (Student Representative)
    Mary Jane Fallot: Engagement (Alumni)
    Eva Koelzer: Engagement (Student Representative)
    Sherry Owens: Engagement (Communications)
    Luke Yates: Engagement (Engage @ EMU)
    Molly Dixon: Operations (Student Representative)
    Lyla Evans: Operations (Parking)
    Callie Gavorek: Operations (Dining)
    Chris Grant: Operations (Facilities)
    Wes Howell: Operations (Rec/IM)
    Negar Matin: Operations (Student Representative)
    Kirsten Olson-Roque: Operations (Student Representative)
    Lewis Savage: Operations (Housing)
    Mike Valdes: Operations (Business and Finance)
    Kevin Kucera: Planning and Administration (Enrollment)
    Chris Finch: Planning and Administration (Children's Institute)
    Luis Romero: Planning and Administration (Student Government)

     

  • PA 2: Sustainability Planning (4 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has published one or more written plans that include measurable sustainability objectives.

    EMU is currently undergoing a reconsideration of its university strategic plan, but the current plan has sustainability addressed under the strategic theme of "Institutional Effectiveness". Specifically, goal 2 states, "Improve processes and resource allocation to enhance operational effectiveness and fiscal stewardship" with objective 3 stating, "Institute activities and procedures to ensure environmental sustainability and awareness at EMU".

    The EMU Strategic Plan can be found at https://www.emich.edu/strategicplan/.

  • PA 3: Participatory Governance (3 points available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution has adopted a framework for engaging internal stakeholders (i.e., students, staff, faculty) in governance and/or external stakeholders (i.e. local community members).
  • PA 4: Diversity and Equity Coordination (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has a diversity and equity committee, office and/or officer (or the equivalent) tasked by the administration or governing body to advise on and implement policies, programs, and trainings related to diversity, equity, inclusion and human rights on campus and/or the institution makes cultural competence trainings and activities available to students, staff and/or faculty.

    The Faculty Development Center Diversity and inclusion page provides a list of faculty resources related to diversity and inclusion across the United States. The database includes various associations, centers, and universities that offer diversity and inclusion resources for instruction. These are then further analyzed into categories; best practices, teaching strategies, student involvement, mentoring for faculty, training seminars, etc.

    The Department of Diversity and Community Involvement has a mission to support and empower minoritized students, provide intentional learning experiences, and challenge systems and structures that perpetuate inequities. The department includes the center for multicultural affairs, the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Resource Center, The VISION volunteer center, and the Women's Resource Center.

    The Office of Diversity & Affirmative Action provides programs fostering a diverse faculty, staff, and student body. They’re a resource for the entire EMU community for all diversity and equal opportunity issues.

    The President’s Commission on Diversity and Inclusion promotes diversity, equity, and inclusion of all members of the university community, and to empower their full participation. The Commission facilitates the aspirational pursuit of social justice and dialogue as informed by intersectional perspectives of race, ethnicity, culture, gender, class, sexual orientation, disability, age, religion, national origin, and language.

    Cultural competency trainings are available at the following:
    https://www.emich.edu/dci/training/ (Students)
    https://emuetraining.bridgeapp.com/learner/library (Staff) The module, "Preventing Workplace Harassment" is required by all faculty and staff.

  • PA 5: Assessing Diversity and Equity (1 point available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has engaged in a structured assessment process during the previous three years to improve diversity, equity, and inclusion on campus. 

    EMU has administered the Biennial Campus Climate Assessment for the first time during the 2018-2019 academic year. The Assessment was developed by an external agency according to specified criteria and implemented through appropriate university offices as designated by the President. It will be administered on an ongoing basis, this assessment will use mixed methods to measure:

    1. The atmosphere or ambiance of Eastern Michigan University as perceived by the campus community, and as reflected in institutional structures, policies, and practices;
    2. The attitudes and values of the campus community members and its leaders; and
    3. The personal interactions and experiences, regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion, that reflect the level of personal safety, value, fairness and respect perceived by all sectors of the university community, i.e., students, faculty, staff, and administrators.

    Results of the Assessment will be posted as soon as the results are available.

    A Periodic Institutional Diversity Audit implementation plan has been developed, but not administered yet. The plan will be administered by appropriate offices as designated by the President, to gather data on the diversity, equity and inclusion profile of all university programs, protocols, policies, facilities, students, and personnel. This data will be a first step in determining the impact of institutional inequity on all phases of university operations, and in developing a path forward toward comprehensive institutional excellence.

    Informed by the data secured from the Biennial Campus Climate Assessment and the Institutional Diversity Audit. The Strategic Action Plan for DEI will be developed through a process coordinated by the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in conjunction with appropriate administrative offices as designated by the President. The plan will include metrics by which to evaluate success in achieving designated DEI goals, as reflected in periodic audits and assessments.

    A diversity impact analysis will demonstrate how proposed recommendations regarding programming, re-organization, personnel, and budget will affect the pursuit of DEI within the unit in question. Its goal is to address the operation of implicit bias and systemic inequities by creating purposeful pro-active awareness of and integration of the impact on DEI of routine university decision-making. Appropriate offices, as designated by the President, will develop the Diversity Impact Analysis.

    EMU has also assessed employee diversity and employment equity. The Human Resource’s Long-Term Strategic Goals and 1 Year Human Resources Overarching Targets (Fiscal Year 2018-2019) are designed to touch on individual ideas, combining to create the 2018-2019 HR Priority Projects by Department

    HR’s Long-Term Strategic Goals
    1. Attract, retain and reward a talented and diverse workforce
    2. Communicate consistently and transparently
    3. Develop new and more effective ways of working
    4. Maximize our human capital

    1 Year HR Overarching Targets (Fiscal Year 2018-2019)
    1. Total Rewards and Wellness: provide comprehensive, modern, and competitive compensation and benefit programs and solutions to best meet the needs of employees, retirees, and their dependents. Foster employee well-being.
    2. Labor and Employee Relations: Improve HR access, availability and overall customer service to internal clients
    3. Diversity and Affirmative Action: Increase the diversity awareness of faculty and staff by being a proactive and organically engaged function.
    4. HRIS: Drive towards an all-encompassing climate of self service and automation
    5. Learning, Organizational Development and Talent: Implement a Talen Management strategy that will begin to transition the function from it’s current state to a transparent and accessible process resulting in improved employee engagement

  • PA 6: Support for Underrepresented Groups (3 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has policies, programs or initiatives to support underrepresented groups and foster a more diverse and inclusive campus community. 

    EMU has a publicly posted non-discrimination policy

    Eastern Michigan University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic or national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, age, ancestry, disability, military status, veteran status of other non-merit reason, in admissions, education programs or activities and employment and complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Elliot-Larsen Civil Rights Act.

    EMU has a discrimination response protocol

    The Office of Ombuds serves as a resource for students regarding any complaint, grievance or appeal that may be academic or non-academic in nature. Students receive timely, objective and strategic information in a confidential manner to assist with the interpretation of policies and procedures. The role of the Ombuds is to ensure adherence to EMU policy, confirm due process as it relates to institutional protocol, assist with resolution and prevention of both academic and non-academic concerns, and to make appropriate data based recommendations to the Office of the Provost. The Ombuds works directly with students, faculty, and staff, providing consultation related to university policies and procedures. It has established itself as an objective, non-biased operation that continues to work towards developing a fair and equitable university community.

    Eastern Michigan University also allows for any members of the University Community, or an individual not affiliated with Eastern Michigan University to submit a report of an alleged violation of the Code of Community Responsibility. All reports of student misconduct must be submitted, in writing, to the Office of Wellness and Community Responsibility. Reports can also be written electronically at EMU's Public Incident Report. Actions may be imposed after a student is found responsible for a violation of the Code of Community Responsibility. An administrative action is generally combined with a restorative action in order to promote corrective behavior. The actions are determined by the community responsibility administrator, or the hearing board assigned to the case, and take into account the impact of the violation on the community, prior incidents and implemented actions. Actions issued may include, but are not limited to:

    Administrative Actions

    1. Formal reprimand
    2. Disciplinary Probation
    3. Suspension
    4. Deferred Suspension
    5. Permanent Dismissal
    6. Delay and/or Denial of Degree Award
    7. Revocation of Degree

    Restorative Actions

    1. Restitution
    2. Fines
    3. Community Service
    4. Educational Activities
    5. Restrictions

    Administrative Actions for Student Organizations

    1. Formal Reprimand
    2. Disciplinary Probation
    3. Suspension
    4. Deferred Suspension
    5. Permanent Termination of University Status
    EMU has the following mentoring, counseling, and peer support programs 
    Support for training underrepresented minorities as future faculty
    1. EMU Edge is a four-year academic support program designed to help students realize their higher education goals.
    2. Holman Success Center provides services to all students that support the development of skills they need to achieve academic success
    3. UNIV courses are designed to help first-year students transition to the academic rigors of college. Students completing UNIV earn higher grades and persist at higher rates than their peers
    EMU has a publicly accessible map of gender neutral bathrooms
    EMU has housing options to accommodate the special needs of transgender and transitioning students
  • PA 7: Affordability and Access (4 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: All of the data provided in this criteria are for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    EMU tracks accessibility and affordability 

    The percentage of entering students that are low-income = 48%

    The graduation/success rate for low-income students = 50%

    The percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid = 45% for FTIAC 47%, all FT Undergrads

    The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required = 30%

    The following policies and programs are used by EMU to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

    Federal Pell Grant

    • # of Recipients of Pell Grants = 6548 (48%)
    • Total $ Amount of Pell Grants = $26,114,751
    • Funded and awarded by the federal government to students with exceptional
      financial need as determined by the FAFSA
    • Grant amount depends on expected family contribution (EFC) and is prorated based
      on level of enrollment (full-time, half-time, etc.)
    • Lifetime limit of six years eligibility or the full-time equivalent of six years
      if attending less than full-time

    Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

    • Funded by the federal government and awarded by EMU (limited funding)
    • Priority consideration is given to students who receive the Federal Pell Grant,
      meet the priority deadline and demonstrate the greatest financial need ($0 EFC)
    • Must be enrolled at least half-time (award prorates based on enrollment)

    Federal Work Study

    • Need-based financial aid program funded by the federal government and EMU
    • Awarded to students based on financial need as determined by FAFSA
    • Awards are earned and paid through the payroll process in the form of a bi-
      weekly paycheck
    • Due to limited funding, you're encouraged to file your FAFSA early
    • Don’t forget to indicate on your FAFSA that you're interested in work study
    • The Non-Enrolled Summer Work Study application provides employment opportunities
      for students who wish to work during summer semester but will not be enrolled

    Tuition Incentive Program (TIP)

    • An incentive program helping students complete high school by providing tuition
      assistance for the first two years of college and beyond. $500 award for four
      semesters totaling $2000.
    • Must have or have had Medicaid coverage for 24 months with a 36 consecutive
      month period as identified by the Michigan Department of Human Services.
    • EMU is Phase II of the program; student not eligible for TIP until 56 hours are
      earned (or an associates degree). 
    The following  programs are used by EMU to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds

    At-Risk Simulation Training
    SAFE Now (Stigma and Fear End Now) provides free Kognito training for faculty and
    staff. Kognito training helps individuals recognize signs of distress in students
    and understand successful strategies to help.

    The following EMU programs guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education

    Upward Bound: See https://www.emich.edu/upwardbound/

    The Early College Alliance (ECA): a unique educational program designed to fully immerse high school-aged students into the post-secondary learning environment. ECA is a public, early/middle college program located on the campus of Eastern Michigan University. It exists in partnership with local school districts, including the Washtenaw Intermediate School District.

    The program gives students an opportunity to earn college credits while still in high school and offers strong, academically focused students a chance to enroll in advanced, college-level coursework. It also provides an alternative for students who may not feel connected to their school.

    ECA allows students to:

    • Graduate from high school with a diploma and up to 60 college credits.
    • Attend classes on a university campus with support.
    • Learn in a college environment that fosters maturity and academic growth.
    • Gain vital skills for college success.

    ECA is funded through a percentage of each district's foundation allowance and
    continues seeking additional funding through both public and private sources.

    EMU TRIO SSS Program

    A program funded by the U.S. Department of Education to provide opportunities for academic development, assist students with basic college requirements and to motivate students toward the successful completion of their postsecondary education by meeting one of the following three requirements:
    1) First-Generation Status (the parent or guardian with whom the student resides
    has not completed a four-year bachelor’s degree)
    2) Low Income Status (a student’s family’s taxable income for the preceding year
    did not exceed 150% of the federal poverty level)
    3) Documented Disability (i.e. IEP in K-12 and/or accommodations from the EMU
    DRC for a learning, physical, or mental disability)

    EMU provides the following institutional scholarships for low-income students

    Education First Opportunity Scholarship (traditional freshman)

    • # of Recipients of the EFOS Scholarship = 1078
    • Total $ Amount of EFOS Scholarship = $7,985,467
    • Tuition = Pell Grant + EFOS
    • Students Eligible with 3.0 cumulative high school GPA and a 20 ACT or 1030 SAT
      on the 1600 scale.
    • Michigan & Ohio Residents
    • FAFSA filed by February 1

    Women's Resource Center Woman of Excellence Scholarship

    Scholarship Requirements:

    • Be a Junior or Senior to apply (56+ credits earned)
    • Have a 2.5 or better GPA
    • Demonstrate "financial need" as determined by the Eastern Michigan University
      Office of Financial Aid
    • Write a 500 - 750 word Personal Statement, answering the question: How have you
      contributed to women's affairs on campus? 5. Provide 1
    • Letter of Recommendation from a personal or professional reference that can
      speak to how you have contributed to women's affairs on campus.
    EMU's targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds
    • Sponsors bus visit for low-income to bus students to campus
    • Specific college fairs targeted at low-income community such as Detroit decision day
    EMU's other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students
    • Academic Success Partnerships (ASP) was established in 2012 to equip students with relevant skills and training to be active learners focused on persistence and degree completion. Our commitment provides support beyond the classroom to help students manage work, life, and development during their collegiate experience. We engage students by creating an uplifting and inclusive campus environment designed to affirm students through structured programming, workshops, mentoring, coaching, and educational opportunities.
    • Brotherhood and Sisterhood Initiative
    • Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)
    • King-Chavez-Parks (KCP) College Day
    • Mentorship Access Guidance In College (MAGIC)
    • Michigan College/University Partnership (MICUP) Baccalaureate
    • Education Achievement Track (BEAT)
    • Scholars Programs (Detroit Promise, Detroit Compact, Road to Completion, & Wade
      McCree)
    EMU's on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students

    The Collaborative: Ypsilanti YMCA Child Development Center is a collective community-centered response to providing quality child care to low-income families in Ypsilanti and to EMU students with children. Licensed and managed by the YMCA and situated at the former Chappelle Elementary in Ypsilanti, the Collaborative partners include: Eastern Michigan University ([email protected] Office and the Office of the President), Ypsilanti Community Schools and the Ypsilanti Housing Commission.

    Children's Institute: EMU Children's Institute's mission is to provide high-quality early childhood education programs for the children of EMU students, faculty, staff and surrounding communities. We participate in preparing EMU students to be early childhood education teachers. The Children's Institute provides high-quality care and education for children 18 months through 6 years. A full day program is available for toddlers, and full and half day programs are available for preschoolers. Flights of Imagination, the summer program at the Children's Institute, offers exciting and varied programs for children entering kindergarten through first grade.

    EMU's other policies and programs to support non-traditional students

    Women's Independence Scholarship Program (WISP) The objective of WISP is to help survivors of intimate partner abuse obtain an education that will in turn offer them the chance to secure employment, personal independence and self sufficiency.

    Jeannette Rankin Women's Scholarship Fund (35+) JRF provides opportunities for women nationwide to secure careers and break the cycle of poverty. Each scholarship recipient has a vision of how education will benefit herself, her family and her community. While the women come from diverse backgrounds, they are all united and motivated by their goal to succeed through education.

    AARP Scholarship (50+) The AARP Foundation Women's Scholarship Program is helping win back opportunity for low-income, 50-plus women by funding education, training, and skills upgrades that can lead to better employment and increased financial security for women and their families.

    Patsy Takemoto Mink Education Foundation The Foundation will offer five Education Support Awards of up to $2000 each to assist low-income women with children who are pursuing education or training. Education Support Awards may be used for direct school expenses or for living expenses while you are enrolled in an educational program.

    Soroptimist (Women's Opportunity Awards) Through the program, clubs in 19 countries and territories assist women who provide the primary source of financial support for their families by giving them the resources they need to improve their education, skills, and employment prospects.

    Maeband Scholarship $500 scholarship. To be eligible, applicants must be a mom, or expectant mom, and a US citizen currently enrolled in an accredited American 2- or 4-year university or college, in any field. There is no major or minor requirement. Application were due December 5, 2018.

    Jane M. Klausman Women in Business Scholarship This scholarship is awarded annually to women pursuing undergraduate or master's degrees in business management. The Educational Foundation for Women in Accounting: They awards scholarships to women who are pursuing Accounting degrees at the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels.

    Society of Women Engineers SWE Scholarships support women pursuing ABET-accredited baccalaureate or graduate programs in preparation for careers in engineering, engineering technology and computer science in the United States and Mexico.

  • PA 8: Committee on Investor Responsibility (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has a formally established and active committee on investor responsibility (CIR) or equivalent body that makes recommendations to fund decision-makers on socially and environmentally responsible investment opportunities across asset classes, including proxy voting (if the institution engages in proxy voting). 

    EMU does not have a committee on investor responsibility (CIR) or equivalent body.

  • PA 9: Sustainable Investment (4 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institutions for which investments are handled by the university system, a separate foundation of the institution and/or a management company contracted by the institution should report on the combined activities of those entities either through pursuing positive sustainability investment or investor engagement. 

    EMU does not track sustainable investments and does not engage investors in sustainable investments.

  • PA 10: Investment Disclosure (1 point available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution makes a snapshot of its investment holdings available to the public, including the amount invested in each fund and/or company and proxy voting records. 

    EMU makes its investment holdings available at https://www.emich.edu/busfin/about/investment.php

  • PA 11: Employment Compensation (3 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: More than 75 percent of the institution’s employees receive a living wage (benefits excluded). 

    The minimum wage in Michigan for a single person as of 2019 is $11.29/hr and for a family of three is $21.60. The total number of individuals working at EMU, including student workers and graduate assistants and temps is 4656. Out of this number approximately 66% make more than $11.29. $9.25 - minimum wage is paid to the lowest compensated workers (student workers) in a non-benefited role. Benefited positions receive approx. 38% in benefits in addition to base compensation.

  • PA 12: Assessing Employee Satisfaction (1 point available)Expand dropdown
    Criteria Description: Institution conducts a survey or other evaluation that allows for anonymous feedback to measure employee satisfaction and engagement. 
  • PA 13: Wellness Program (1 point available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has a wellness and/or employee assistance program that makes available counseling, referral and wellbeing services to all students, staff, and/or faculty members. 

     

  • PA 14: Workplace Health and Safety (2 points available)Expand dropdown

    Criteria Description: Institution has reduced its total number of recordable workplace injuries and occupational disease cases per full-time equivalent (FTE) employee compared to a baseline.

    Workplace injuries and occupational disease cases

    Performance year (2018): 38 out of 3590 (1.1%) full-time equivalent employees

    Baseline year (2015): 71 out of 5596 (1.3%) full-time equivalent employees

    Reduction in injuries and cases 16.6%

    EMU workplace health and safety initiatives

    a. Aerial Lift Program
    This Aerial Work Platforms Program is designed to achieve compliance with the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth Construction Safety Standard Part 32. Aerial Work Platforms. This standard applies to the construction, operation, maintenance and inspection of manual and powered aerial work platforms. This program applies to all Eastern Michigan University employees using aerial work platforms. Outside contractors using aerial work platforms must also comply with this program or have an equivalent program. Outside contractors must provide the contracting department with a copy of their program prior to performing the required work. Prior to using an aerial work platform, the aerial lift procedures which follow, shall be implemented to ensure employees are protected from the hazards associated with aerial work platforms.
    b. Asbestos Management
    This Asbestos Management Guideline is designed to achieve compliance with the Michigan Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) General Industry and Construction Standards for Asbestos and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). As well as reduce or eliminate the risk of Eastern Michigan University (EMU) faculty, staff, students and contractor’s exposure to asbestos containing materials. This guideline applies to all EMU employees. Outside contractors must also comply with these guidelines or have a more stringent program.
    c. Bake Sales
    This guideline is designed to provide safe food handling requirements to groups holding food and/or bake sales. This guideline applies to all Eastern Michigan University departments, colleges, divisions, student organizations and groups using EMU facilities.
    d. Bloodborne Pathogen and Exposure Plan
    This Exposure Control Plan (ECP) is designed to minimize or eliminate occupational exposures to blood, blood products or other potentially infectious materials. This plan has been developed to comply with the Federal Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard and the Michigan Bloodborne Infectious Diseases Standard. This plan also includes Eastern Michigan University’s general laboratory safety rules regarding potential exposure to bloodborne pathogens and is designed to provide the minimum requirements for a safe work environment. All Eastern Michigan University departments working with or having the potential for contact with blood, blood products or other potentially infectious materials are required to comply with the Exposure Control Plan (ECP). This plan applies to all employees (faculty, staff, lab or teaching assistants, and student employees) who may be exposed to blood, blood products or other potentially infectious material during the course of their routine work or in an emergency. Each department with employees having the potential for contact with blood, blood products or other potentially infectious material shall ensure the requirements of the ECP are followed.
    e. Broken Fluorescent Bulb Clean-Up Guide
    This guideline is designed to assist University personnel with the cleanup and disposal of broken fluorescent bulbs. This guideline applies to all personnel, including contractors, working with or responsible for disposal of fluorescent bulbs and any other mercury containing bulbs.
    f. Chemical Hygiene Plan
    The purpose of the chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) is to protect faculty, staff, teaching assistants and student workers from chemical exposures in laboratories. This plan has been developed to comply with the Federal Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories Standard (29 CFR 1910.1450) and the Michigan Hazardous Work in Laboratories Standard. This plan also includes Eastern Michigan University’s general laboratory safety rules and is designed to provide the minimum requirements for laboratory safety. All Eastern Michigan University departments with laboratories are required to comply with the Chemical Hygiene Plan. This plan applies to employees (faculty, staff, lab or teaching assistants and student employees) and other personnel working in laboratories who may be exposed to chemicals during the course of their routine work or in an emergency.
    g. Communication of Communicable Disease, Food Bourne Illness and Other Campus Health Issues
    The purpose of this guideline is to facilitate communication and assistance to the affected parties of communicable diseases, food borne illness and other related concerns in a timely manner. This guideline also provides information on the department(s) responsible for addressing these type concerns. This guideline applies to main campus, west campus and the golf course. Satellite campuses must abide by the public health department requirements of the county where they are located.
    h. Confined Space Plan
    The purpose of this document is to establish a confined space entry program in accordance with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard; 29 Code of Federal Regulation Required Confined Spaces" and Part 90 of Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration (MIOSHA) Act 154, Rule R408.19001 "Confined Space Entry".
    i. Hazard Communication Program
    The Eastern Michigan University Hazard Communication Program is designed to achieve compliance with the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) and the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs MIOSHA General Industry Safety Standard Part 92 Hazard Communication. These regulations are designed to protect employees from exposures to hazardous chemicals in the workplace by providing employees with chemical information and training. Eastern Michigan University (EMU) employees are to be provided with a workplace free from recognized hazards causing or likely to cause death or serious injury. Employees must be provided with information on workplace hazards and how to protect themselves from these hazards. The University is prohibited from discharging or discriminating against an employee who exercises any of their rights under the Hazard Communication Standard. All EMU divisions and departments are required to comply with the Hazard Communication Program. This program applies to all employees of the University who may be exposed to hazardous chemicals during the course of their routine work or in a foreseeable emergency. This includes faculty, staff, full and part time employees, temporary employees, administrative personnel, graduate assistants, work study students and student workers. Personnel working in laboratories must receive additional training according to the requirements of the Laboratory Safety Standard and the EMU Chemical Hygiene Plan
    j. Hot Work Safety Program
    The purpose of this Hot Work Program is to provide, in, about or around places of employment, reasonable safety to those involved in welding, cutting, soldering, brazing, work with flames and torches, and acetylene generating and to those exposed to these processes and the equipment and compressed gases used. This Hot Work Program has been written to achieve compliance with the Michigan Department of Consumer and Industry Services, Part 12 Welding and Cutting and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) safety and health in soldering and blazing. This procedure applies to all Eastern Michigan employees involved in the use of flames and torches for maintenance and/or construction work including but not limited to welding, cutting, soldering, brazing, melting and burning. This also applies to any outside contractor providing services to the University.
    k. Lactation Room Hygiene Guideline
    The purpose of this guideline is to ensure hygiene is maintained in lactation rooms on campus. This guideline applies to any room designated as a lactation room or any room used for lactation purposes and applies to all staff, faculty, students and visitors using these rooms.
    l. Lockout/Tagout Program
    The purpose of this Lockout/Tagout Program is to protect individuals servicing and maintaining machines and equipment from the unexpected energization or start up of the machines/equipment or the release of stored energy which could cause injury. This Lockout/Tagout Program has been written to achieve compliance with the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards Part 85 The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources and Part 40 Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices. This procedure applies to all Eastern Michigan University employees servicing, and/or maintaining machinery and equipment.
    m. Off Road Vehicle
    The purpose of these Off Road Vehicle (ORV) Safety Guidelines is to ensure ORV operators are aware of the hazards that exist when operating an ORV and to prevent unnecessary damage or injuries from their misuse. Off Road Vehicles include but are not limited to: Club cars, John Deere’s, golf carts and other motorized vehicles not designed to drive on the roadway. These guidelines apply to all Eastern Michigan employees, students, volunteers and outside contractors involved in the use of ORVs for the transportation of persons, deliveries and/or grounds work. ORV’s not owned, operated or authorized by EMU cannot be used on the premises.
    n. Personal Protective Equipment Program
    The purpose of this personal protective equipment (PPE) program is to protect the Eastern Michigan University employees form the occupational hazards within the workplace by providing the proper personal protective equipment. It is EMU’s goal to use engineering and administrative controls as the primary method for protecting employees. However, when additional protection is necessary, appropriate PPE shall be worn. The scope of the program includes PPE for eye, face, head, foot, and hand protection. If a respirator and/or hearing protection is necessary, their use is covered by the Respiratory Protection Program and the Hearing Conservation Program, respectively.
    o. Powered Groundskeeping Equipment Program
    Eastern Michigan University’s Powered Groundskeeping Equipment Procedures Manual has been written to achieve compliance with the Michigan Department of Labor Part 54, Powered Groundskeeping Equipment standard. These procedures were designed to assure the maintenance and the safe operation of powered groundskeeping, related equipment and attachments and their safe use by employees. All Eastern Michigan University departments using powered groundskeeping equipment are required to comply with these procedures. This includes, but is not limited to Grounds, Athletics, Olds Rec, Housing, University Apartments and the Golf Course.
    p. Powered Industrial Trucks Program
    Eastern Michigan University’s Powered Industrial Truck Program has been written to achieve compliance with the Michigan Department of Labor Part 21 Powered industrial Trucks standard. This standard provides the minimum safety rules for the care and use of powered industrial trucks and provides for operator safety and equipment specifications. All Eastern Michigan University departments using powered industrial trucks are required to comply with these procedures. This includes but is not limited to Physical Plant, Athletics, Industrial Technology, and University Stores.
    q. Safety Policy and Procedures Program
    To identify the safety rules and regulations of Eastern Michigan University. All divisions and departments are required to comply with Eastern Michigan University's safety policy and procedures. This policy and procedures applies to all employees including faculty, staff, full and part time employees, temporary employees, administrative personnel, graduate assistants, work study students, and student workers. Employees responsible for students in classes shall enforce this policy.
    r. Security of Hazardous Materials in Transport
    This Security of Hazardous Materials in Transport plan has been written to provide for the safe transport of hazardous materials and comply with the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) regulations 49 CFR Part 172. This plan applies to all Eastern Michigan University (EMU) personnel who are involved in the management or transport of hazardous materials, either through the direct handling or management of vendors.
    s. Tree Trimming and Removal Program
    Eastern Michigan University’s Tree Trimming and Removal Program has been written to achieve compliance with the Michigan Department of Labor Part 53 Tree Trimming and Removal Standard. This standard provides minimum requirements for tools and equipment, their maintenance and repair, and the work practices used in spraying, trimming, pruning, repair and removal of trees by an employer and their use by an employee in, around and about a place of employment, except those operations considered to be logging or the harvesting of logs. All Eastern Michigan University Departments conducting tree trimming and tree removal are required to comply within these procedures.
    t. Working on Fume Hood Systems
    This guideline was developed to protect personnel working on roofs, equipment on roofs and using fume hoods from exposures to hazardous materials. This guideline applies to all persons, including contractors, working on the interior of fume hoods. This guideline shall be followed for work conducted in the following buildings: Coatings Research Institute, Mark Jefferson, Marshall, Roosevelt, Sherzer, Sill and Strong. The guideline shall also be followed on any new buildings containing fume hoods.
    u. Working on Roofs of Buildings with Fume Hood Exhausts
    This guideline was developed to protect personnel working on roofs, equipment on roofs and using fume hoods from exposures to hazardous materials. This guideline applies to all personnel, including contractors, working on the roofs of buildings with fume hood exhausts. This guideline shall be followed for work conducted on the roofs of the following buildings: Coatings Research Institute, Mark Jefferson, Marshall, Roosevelt, Sherzer, Sill and Strong. These procedures shall also be followed on any new buildings containing fume hoods and any additional buildings with similar exhaust hazards.
    v. Working on Roofs with Outdoor Warning Systems
    This procedure is designed to protect personnel working on roofs and equipment on roofs from exposure to dangerous noise levels as the result of the Outdoor Warning System (OWS) or county civil defense siren (CDS). This procedure shall be followed by EMU employees and contracted employees for work conducted on the roofs of the following buildings: Mark Jefferson Science Complex, Owen College of Business, Convocation Center, Goddard, Halle Library, King, Phelps, Sculpture Studio/Central Stores, Student Center.

STARS bonus category: Innovation and Leadership (4 bonus points available)

Innovation credits are open-ended and reserved for new, extraordinary, unique, groundbreaking or uncommon outcomes, policies and practices that address sustainability challenges and are not covered by an existing credit or exemplary practice option.

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